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Sen. Marco Rubio: Obama's Cuba Deal Is Bad Foreign Policy

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Sen. Marco Rubio: Obama's Cuba Deal Is Bad Foreign Policy

Latin America

Sen. Marco Rubio: Obama's Cuba Deal Is Bad Foreign Policy

Sen. Marco Rubio: Obama's Cuba Deal Is Bad Foreign Policy

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/371483140/371483141" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

We hear Cuban-American reaction and some of what Cuban President Raul Castro had to say today.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And that changing relationship is something that Frank Calzon is questioning.

FRANK CALZON: The president has given Cuba - most of the Cuban government - most of what they want.

BLOCK: Calzon is executive director of a group called the Center for a Free Cuba, based in Washington. Like many Cuban-Americans, he says he's happy U.S. contractor Alan Gross is free, but he says President Obama has not held Cuba accountable on a number of fronts, especially human rights.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Republican Senator Marco Rubio of Florida is also railing against the president's move.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

SENATOR MARCO RUBIO: This president has proven today that his foreign policy is more than just naive. It is willfully ignorant of the way the world truly works.

CORNISH: In Cuba, meanwhile, President Raul Castro sounded satisfied when he addressed his nation.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

PRESIDENT RAUL CASTRO: (Foreign language spoken).

CORNISH: Raul Castro said today's deal was a result of dialogue directly with President Obama. He said the two were able to make advancements of interest to both the U.S. and Cuba.

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