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Kids May Not Benefit From Extended Isolation After Concussions
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Kids May Not Benefit From Extended Isolation After Concussions

Research News

Kids May Not Benefit From Extended Isolation After Concussions

Kids May Not Benefit From Extended Isolation After Concussions
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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/375434439/375434444" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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New research suggests isolating children with concussions for more than two days may do more harm than good compared to adults. So what's the best approach to treating concussed children? Melissa Block talks with lead researcher Dr. Danny G. Thomas of the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin.

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