NPR logo
Court Awards Sly Stone $5 Million In Lost Royalties
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/383036393/383036394" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Court Awards Sly Stone $5 Million In Lost Royalties

Music News

Court Awards Sly Stone $5 Million In Lost Royalties

Court Awards Sly Stone $5 Million In Lost Royalties
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/383036393/383036394" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Singer Sly Stone has been awarded $5 million in damages and lost royalties. He claimed his manager and lawyer didn't pay him royalties between 1989 and 2000.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "DANCE TO THE MUSIC")

SLY AND THE FAMILY STONE: (Singing) Dance to the music. Dance to the music. Dance to the music. All we need...

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

That is Sly and The Family Stone with their 1968 hit "Dance To The Music." This week, the band's lead singer Sly Stone is dancing to the tune of $5 million. A Los Angeles Superior Court found that the front man had not been fully paid for songwriting royalties. Stone claimed that his manager and attorney duped him into signing a shareholder agreement that diverted his royalties to them. The musician says he did not receive any royalties between 1989 and the year 2000. Although this is good news for Sly Stone, he may have to wait a while to get his hands on the cash as the other side plans to appeal.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "EVERYDAY PEOPLE")

SLY AND THE FAMILY STONE: (Singing) I am everyday people.

Copyright © 2015 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.