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Twitter: Biggest Virtual Sports Bar In The World

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Twitter: Biggest Virtual Sports Bar In The World

Sports

Twitter: Biggest Virtual Sports Bar In The World

Twitter: Biggest Virtual Sports Bar In The World

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According to Twitter, fans sent more than 28 million tweets during Sunday night's game — the most tweeted-about Super Bowl ever.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And, you know, Twitter calls itself the biggest virtual sports bar in the world. And according to the company, fans sent more than 28 million tweets during last night's game, the most tweeted-about Super Bowl ever. Some fans noted the serious tone in many commercials, like ESPN's Kevin Negandhi. He said, quote, "Dear ad agencies, it's OK to make us laugh, too." Other users riffed on Katy Perry's halftime show. Rapper Snoop Dogg tweeted that he was dancing next to her inside one of the shark costumes. But the biggest reaction came after Malcolm Butler intercepted that pass with seconds left on the clock to seal the title for New England. That play generated 395,000 tweets per minute. A lot of armchair quarterbacks questioned the decision to throw so close to the goal line. One fan using the handle @freedarko (ph) called it the, quote, "worst play call ever in human history."

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