NPR logo
Why A Young Minneapolis Man Wanted To Join ISIS
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/389321626/389321629" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Why A Young Minneapolis Man Wanted To Join ISIS

National Security

Why A Young Minneapolis Man Wanted To Join ISIS

Why A Young Minneapolis Man Wanted To Join ISIS
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/389321626/389321629" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

There has been a development in a story we heard on the program last week. An 18-year-old Minnesota man named Abdullahi Yusuf is at the center of an experiment in deradicalization in this country. He entered a guilty plea today which clears the way for him to take next steps in his counseling program.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Now a development in a story we heard on this program last week. NPR's Dina Temple-Raston told us about an 18-year-old Minnesota man arrested for trying to join ISIS. Today he entered a guilty plea and, as Dina reports, began to explain why he wanted to join the group.

DINA TEMPLE-RASTON, BYLINE: In his plea agreement, Abdullahi Yusuf told prosecutors that last spring he and a handful of his friends began to get together to talk about going to fight in Syria. The young men agreed the regime there was killing innocent Muslims, and they wanted to stop it. The timing is important. It was before the U.S. declared ISIS a terrorist organization and before the group had started beheading hostages. While he awaits sentencing, a judge has allowed Yusuf to start a kind of de-radicalization program.

MARY MCKINLEY: We were approached by his attorneys. They knew that we had worked with Somali American teens in the past.

TEMPLE-RASTON: That's Mary McKinley, the person behind the rehab program. The plea clears the way for the counseling to begin. Dina Temple-Raston, NPR News.

Copyright © 2015 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.