NPR logo
12This Is I
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/401523499/401570871" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Buy Featured Music

    Song
    This Is I
    Album
    Who Me?
    Artist
    Juan Wauters
    Label
    Captured Tracks
    Released
    2015

    Your purchase helps support NPR programming. How?

Songs We Love: Juan Wauters, 'This Is I'

Songs We Love: Juan Wauters, 'This Is I'

"This Is I" embodies Queens songwriter Juan Wauters's path from punk to poet. i

"This Is I" embodies Queens songwriter Juan Wauters's path from punk to poet. Nicole Ucedo/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption Nicole Ucedo/Courtesy of the artist
"This Is I" embodies Queens songwriter Juan Wauters's path from punk to poet.

"This Is I" embodies Queens songwriter Juan Wauters's path from punk to poet.

Nicole Ucedo/Courtesy of the artist

Queens-via-Uruguay songwriter Juan Wauters rose to internet acclaim as a member of the obstreperous rock band The Beets, one of New York City's most beloved DIY acts of the 21st century. In the time since The Beets' initial breakup in 2012, Wauters has pursued a more introspective, subdued sound, writing songs that explore who he is and how "he" came to be.

Considering his path from punk to poet during the past three years, "This Is I" is the quintessential Wauters song. The eccentric philosopher spends the song singing to his parents, alternating between subjective and objective pronouns as he contemplates how humans can't help but shape their offspring's identities. "How you doing? This is I," he sings, as if he's finally wriggled free of received wisdom after living 30 years in someone else's shadow.

Wauters' second solo album, Who Me?, is out May 12 on Captured Tracks.

Purchase Featured Music

Who Me?

Purchase Music

Buy Featured Music

Album
Who Me?
Artist
Juan Wauters
Label
Captured Tracks
Released
2015

Your purchase helps support NPR programming. How?

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.