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Bryce Harper Or Mike Trout: Are These Two Too Good?
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Bryce Harper Or Mike Trout: Are These Two Too Good?

Bryce Harper Or Mike Trout: Are These Two Too Good?

Bryce Harper Or Mike Trout: Are These Two Too Good?
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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/429353794/429597241" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Los Angeles Angel Mike Trout (left) and Washington National Bryce Harper during warmups before the start of an April 2014 baseball game in Washington. i

Los Angeles Angel Mike Trout (left) and Washington National Bryce Harper during warmups before the start of an April 2014 baseball game in Washington. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

toggle caption Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP
Los Angeles Angel Mike Trout (left) and Washington National Bryce Harper during warmups before the start of an April 2014 baseball game in Washington.

Los Angeles Angel Mike Trout (left) and Washington National Bryce Harper during warmups before the start of an April 2014 baseball game in Washington.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Because college football and basketball are so prominent, when the best players move up to the pros they're already well-known.

However, baseball's different.

How many of you pretty good sports fans can tell me who won the baseball College World Series just a few weeks ago? Same with the players. Even the stars drafted highest are anonymous except to the real cognoscenti. And even then, whereas invariably the can't-miss prospects in other sports don't miss, hardly ever miss, in baseball nobody ever says: Can't miss. Fact is, the ones who miss too often are the scouts.

Click the audio above to hear what Frank Deford has to say about these two players.

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