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Liz Vice Tracks Her Path To Gospel
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Liz Vice Tracks Her Path To Gospel

Music Interviews

Liz Vice Tracks Her Path To Gospel

Liz Vice Tracks Her Path To Gospel
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Liz Vice's new album, There's a Light, comes out Sept. 25. i

Liz Vice's new album, There's a Light, comes out Sept. 25. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of the artist
Liz Vice's new album, There's a Light, comes out Sept. 25.

Liz Vice's new album, There's a Light, comes out Sept. 25.

Courtesy of the artist

Liz Vice didn't grow up with gospel music, and she never really thought of herself as a singer. Things change: The 32-year-old from Portland, Ore. has now released an album called There's A Light, whose songs and sound challenge many of the stereotypes about Christian music.

"I started going to a church almost six years ago and they had a 'worship team' — two sets of musicians that would lead worship on Sundays," Vice recalls. "One day I was sitting there listening, and I had this little voice say, 'You need to go and sing on the worship team.' And I'm like, 'Oh no. Where is this coming from?'"

Vice auditioned, got in, and soon found music and performance flooding into her life. Hear more of her conversation with NPR's Rachel Martin at the audio link.

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