Survivors Recount Meltdown In Nobel Winner's Chronicle Of Chernobyl Svetlana Alexievich won the Nobel Prize in Literature this week. One of her best-known works is a book called Voices from Chernobyl.
NPR logo

Survivors Recount Meltdown In Nobel Winner's Chronicle Of Chernobyl

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/447451339/447451340" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Survivors Recount Meltdown In Nobel Winner's Chronicle Of Chernobyl

Survivors Recount Meltdown In Nobel Winner's Chronicle Of Chernobyl

Survivors Recount Meltdown In Nobel Winner's Chronicle Of Chernobyl

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/447451339/447451340" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Svetlana Alexievich won the Nobel Prize in Literature this week. One of her best-known works is a book called Voices from Chernobyl.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

A book called "Voices From Chernobyl" may be the work that Svetlana Alexievich is best known for. She was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature this week. And there's a section in her book in which a survivor tells what the nuclear meltdown at Chernobyl did even to the survivors nearby.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: (Reading) We're afraid of everything. We're afraid for our children and for our grandchildren, who don't exist yet. They don't exist, and we're already afraid. People smile less; they sing less at holidays. The landscape changes because instead of fields, the forest rises up again. But the national character changes, too. Everyone's depressed; it's a feeling of doom. Chernobyl is a metaphor, a symbol. And it's changed our everyday life and our thinking.

SIMON: The words of Nadjiesda Borakova (ph) who survived Chernobyl, as read by an actor. The meltdown occurred nearly 30 years ago. Wildlife is back. Human life is not.

Copyright © 2015 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.