Dear NBA: Why So Many Games? Basketball players don't endure numerous concussions like some football players do, nor do they suffer the arm injuries common to baseball pitchers. But the grind on the hardwood can wear bodies down.
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Dear NBA: Why So Many Games?

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Dear NBA: Why So Many Games?

Dear NBA: Why So Many Games?

Dear NBA: Why So Many Games?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/460685013/460784683" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Julie Jacobson/AP
New York Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony is stripped of the ball by Orlando Magic forward Tobias Harris (second from left) as New York Knicks center Robin Lopez (far right) reaches in during the fourth quarter of their game Monday in New York.
Julie Jacobson/AP

Until Dec. 12, the Golden State Warriors were undefeated, 24-0. They're the popular NBA defending champs, who play a fun style, led by an absolutely beguiling star, Stephen Curry. It's hard enough to draw attention away from the NFL, but the Warriors caught the public fancy, going for the record of most consecutive wins ever in major league sports.

Then a mediocre Milwaukee team clobbered them, and back everybody's attention went to Tom Brady, the Carolina Panthers and the point spreads of the week.

Click the audio to hear Frank Deford's commentary on the NBA.

Correction Dec. 23, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly say the Golden State Warriors were undefeated until last week. They actually lost their first game on Dec. 12.