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Can Psychology Teach Us How To Stick To New Year's Resolutions?
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Can Psychology Teach Us How To Stick To New Year's Resolutions?

Can Psychology Teach Us How To Stick To New Year's Resolutions?

Can Psychology Teach Us How To Stick To New Year's Resolutions?
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Research out of the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania suggests that people see New Year's Day, their birthdays and even the start of a new month or week as "temporal landmarks" — an imaginary line demarcating the old "inferior" self from a new and improved version. That explains why we often fail at resolutions — our new selves are usually not much better than the old ones. But it also suggests how we might stick to our resolutions — use more temporal landmarks to reach our goals.

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