NPR logo

For Art's Sake, Minneapolis Man Freezes His Pants

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/464180267/464180268" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
For Art's Sake, Minneapolis Man Freezes His Pants

U.S.

For Art's Sake, Minneapolis Man Freezes His Pants

For Art's Sake, Minneapolis Man Freezes His Pants

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/464180267/464180268" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

NPR's Rachel Martin notes an art installation, of sorts, by Tim Grotting. During the winter, the Minneapolis resident freezes pants and sets them upright in his neighborhood.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Hey, are you freezing your pants off? A genial Minnesotan named Tim Grotting has an idea for you. When the temperature drops below freezing in Minneapolis, as it is often wont to do this time of year, he freezes pants. Yep, freezes them, standing up. And then he creates these vignettes throughout his neighborhood.

Here's how you do it. You submerge the pants in water then shake them outside in the cold. Grotting says it takes about a half an hour. His teenage sons call the pants the fellas. Tim Grotting challenged his neighbors to the north to try it too since Canada is, as he says, a, quote, "mecca for frozen things." I guess the next step is to freeze a shirt alongside it or overalls or leggings. In fact, in pictures, it looks like a couple of the fellas would like some company - maybe from a skirt.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "COLD AS ICE")

FOREIGNER: (Singing) Oh, ah, you're as cold as ice. You're as cold as ice.

Copyright © 2016 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.