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How Democratic Candidates Are Faring In Iowa
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How Democratic Candidates Are Faring In Iowa

Politics

How Democratic Candidates Are Faring In Iowa

How Democratic Candidates Are Faring In Iowa
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NPR's David Greene and Rachel Martin talk about how the Democratic presidential hopefuls are doing before the Iowa caucus.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And we are back with Morning Edition host David Greene, who's leading our coverage in Iowa. So the two big Democratic candidates, Clinton and Sanders, David, is that how Iowa Democrats are separating themselves, as diehards for either Hillary or Bernie?

DAIVD GREENE, BYLINE: I think diehards is a good word, Rachel. You know, it's - it's important, I think, to point out there are people who really want Hillary Clinton to be president, and you hear from them. You know, we sat down with the president of the College Democrats at the University of Iowa we were just hearing Sam report from. And, I mean, she was so passionate. And you could just feel her passion for Hillary Clinton, feeling like it is time for her to be in the White House. But there is this swell of passion for Bernie Sanders right now, and you heard that in that piece. And I think it's one of the interesting dynamics here in the Democratic side of the race. You know, Barack Obama, when he won Iowa in 2008, he had the organization. Had the passion. There's a feeling right now that that's sort of divided, that you have Bernie Sanders with the passion. You have Hillary Clinton with the organization. And it'll be really interesting to see what that means.

MARTIN: So the caucuses, I mean, it is all about organization because you can't just inspire people with your rhetoric. You have to get people to show up. And this is a time commitment, right?

GREENE: It's huge. I mean, it's spending a night - and what sounds like it might be a snowy night, depending on when this blizzard arrives in Iowa (laughter)...

MARTIN: Yeah.

GREENE: You go out. You're spending, you know, more than an hour with, you know, your neighbors. And it's a process. And, you know, it's a small subset of Iowans. Sam Sanders, our colleague who you just heard, he did a piece a few weeks ago talking to many Iowans who don't even know what the caucus is. So it's a reminder it's not every single Iowan who's going out and doing this on Monday night. But the people who do, Rachel, they take it so, so seriously. And it's sort of a beautiful, beautiful thing to watch, especially in an election year that in many ways is, you know, has been very noisy and a lot of sound bites. This is going to be just lovely. It's why I love coming here, and you know, Iowa doesn't mean everything. They don't always pick the winner, but there's something special about it. And they're certainly going to be sending a powerful message about American politics this year.

MARTIN: I love it. There is reverence in your voice, David Greene, because you are a man who loves politics (laughter).

GREENE: I love politics, yeah. No, and it's great to be back here.

MARTIN: Listen for David's reporting tomorrow on Morning Edition. David, thanks so much for talking with us.

GREENE: Thanks, Rachel.

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