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Fresh Air Weekend: Bassem Youssef; 'Homegrown Terrorists'; Baby's First Food
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Fresh Air Weekend: Bassem Youssef; 'Homegrown Terrorists'; Baby's First Food

Fresh Air Weekend: Bassem Youssef; 'Homegrown Terrorists'; Baby's First Food

Fresh Air Weekend: Bassem Youssef; 'Homegrown Terrorists'; Baby's First Food
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/465691577/465833940" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Food writer Bee Wilson says that babies are most open to trying new flavors between the ages of 4 and 7 months. i

Food writer Bee Wilson says that babies are most open to trying new flavors between the ages of 4 and 7 months. Duane Ellison/iStock hide caption

toggle caption Duane Ellison/iStock
Food writer Bee Wilson says that babies are most open to trying new flavors between the ages of 4 and 7 months.

Food writer Bee Wilson says that babies are most open to trying new flavors between the ages of 4 and 7 months.

Duane Ellison/iStock

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

'Egyptian Jon Stewart' Bassem Youssef Will Now Satirize U.S. Democracy: Bassem Youssef created what became the most popular TV show in Egypt's history, but the government had the show cancelled, and Youssef fled Egypt.

Who Are America's 'Homegrown Terrorists'?: CNN's Peter Bergen describes how the Internet and social media have been used to radicalize and recruit Americans to jihad — and how some new jihadists then use those same tools to draw in others.

In Baby's 'First Bite,' A Chance To Shape A Child's Taste: Bee Wilson's new book, First Bite, examines how genetics, culture, memory and early feeding patterns influence the palate. She says babies are most open to new flavors between age 4 and 7 months.

You can listen to the original interviews here:

Who Are America's 'Homegrown Terrorists'?

'Egyptian Jon Stewart' Bassem Youssef Will Now Satirize U.S. Democracy

In Baby's 'First Bite,' A Chance To Shape A Child's Taste

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