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Years Without A Squeak, Vintage Museum Artifact Still Works
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Years Without A Squeak, Vintage Museum Artifact Still Works

Strange News

Years Without A Squeak, Vintage Museum Artifact Still Works

Years Without A Squeak, Vintage Museum Artifact Still Works
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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/465819145/465819146" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Scott Simon notes an item from the week in which a present-day mouse found its way into a mousetrap so old it's a museum item.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

A discovery this week at the Museum of English Rural Life at the University of Reading in Great Britain. This is a museum that displays old plows, baskets, sewing machines and what they call dairying equipment from rural British life. BuzzFeed reports that the assistant curator emailed his colleagues to say they found an item on a shelf, quote, "which was not described as being there on the database." It was a mouse, of recent vintage, inside a Colin Pullinger and Sons Perpetual Mouse Trap, which was patented in 1861. And the mousetrap still proclaims on its label - will last a lifetime. A mousetrap - but don't they have an app for that these days?

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