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Panel Round Two
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Panel Round Two

Panel Round Two

Panel Round Two
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More questions for the panel..., Wile E Stoner; Photato, Erectnid

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT ...DON'T TELL ME, the NPR news quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis. We are playing this week with Roy Blount, Jr., Helen Hong and Alonzo Bodden. And here again at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

(APPLAUSE)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you so much. Thank you, Bill. In just a minute, Bill cheers on his beloved Caro-rhyma Panthers in the Listener Limerick Challenge. If you'd like to play, give us a call at 1-888-WAIT-WAIT. That's 1-888-924-8924. Right now, panel, some more questions for you from this week's news. Alonzo, California is having a very strange coyote crisis. You might know this. You live there. Authorities say the recent series of unusual encounters with the animals is due to what?

ALONZO BODDEN: An unusual population of roadrunners?

(LAUGHTER AND APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: (Imitating Roadrunner).

ROY BLOUNT, JR.: (Imitating Roadrunner).

SAGAL: Well, I'll give you a hint. If you could hear what the coyotes were thinking, it would be something along the lines of whoa, look at the colors.

HELEN HONG: Oh, they're high.

BODDEN: Look at the colors? Well, she just said it. They're high on something.

SAGAL: They are in fact high on mushrooms. They're actually...

HONG: What?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

BODDEN: Right, they're eating magic mushrooms. I did read something about that. Yeah, they've been eating magic mushrooms, and the kids in San Francisco are pissed off.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Oh, you can imagine.

(APPLAUSE)

BODDEN: Oh, are they upset.

SAGAL: Yes. Yeah, just to get back at them, all the hipsters in San Francisco are eating small rodents. You know. So there.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Scientists believe that the coyotes are tripping on a psychoactive mushroom, which sounds bad. But do you want a coyote that tries to eat you or one that stands there and giggles for no reason?

(LAUGHTER)

HONG: How are scientists determining them? Are they interviewing them as they're coming down off of the high? Like, how do you know? Like, the coyote's, like, dude you wouldn't believe...

SAGAL: Well, they show them "Fantasia" and see how much they enjoy it.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Roy, big news from the world of art - a custom-made photograph of what has sold for more than $1 million?

BLOUNT: A custom-made photograph of...

SAGAL: It was commissioned.

BLOUNT: ...Of the commissioner.

SAGAL: No.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: We presume the collector will frame it and hang it right on the side of his expensive photograph of meat.

BLOUNT: A potato.

SAGAL: Exactly, a potato.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

HONG: Wow.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: A million dollar photograph of a potato.

BLOUNT: All that - he had all that meat and no potato.

SAGAL: Exactly. Kevin Abosch is a photographer who's famous for his portraits of global celebrities, business titans. And apparently, he was having dinner with this wealthy German businessmen who asked - how much for a picture of a potato? And Abosch says $1 million? Guy says sold. The photographer says - and I am quoting him, "I see commonalities between humans and potatoes that speak to our relationship as individuals within a collective species," unquote.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Also, this jackass gave me $1 million to take a picture of a potato.

BODDEN: How come I can't have a friend like that?

(LAUGHTER)

BODDEN: Just - and you only need one.

SAGAL: That's true.

BODDEN: You know what I mean? Because next year times get a little tight, say hey, I've got a picture of a strawberry.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Roy, a fascinating new fossil find - scientists have discovered, preserved in amber from 100 million years ago, two spiders frozen as they were doing what?

(LAUGHTER)

BLOUNT: What would they be doing? If you were a spider - I believe I know this. Maybe I'm just - have a filthy my mind, but I believe they were in the act of love.

SAGAL: That is in fact true. That's what they were doing.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: It is what they were doing.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: On a very special night back in the Cretaceous period, a daddy longlegs was getting intimate, presumably with a mommy long legs. It was romantic. It was relaxed. The music was playing and then the spider was, like, no, don't fossilize me now.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And what was interesting is that he was fossilized, this spider, in shall we say an excited state...

BLOUNT: Right.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...Which was very exciting for the scientists. They'd never had that before. And remember, if your erection lasts more than 100 million years...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...Way to go. They'll put you in a museum.

HONG: Is there...

BODDEN: You know how scientists find something and they name it after them?

SAGAL: Yeah.

HONG: (Laughter).

BODDEN: Do you put your name on this one or...

(LAUGHTER)

BLOUNT: Your name is Willie.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MAKE IT LAST FOREVER")

KEITH SWEAT: (Singing) Let's make it last. Let's make it last forever and ever. Don't let our love end.

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