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Slow Jam Takes Los Angeles Drivers Out Of Fast Lane
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Slow Jam Takes Los Angeles Drivers Out Of Fast Lane

Politics

Slow Jam Takes Los Angeles Drivers Out Of Fast Lane

Slow Jam Takes Los Angeles Drivers Out Of Fast Lane
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The mayor of Los Angeles, Eric Carcetti, came up with a novel way to warn drivers of a major road closure.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Staying with politics - if you have to give people bad news, what's the best way to tell it? Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti has found a new way to make a hard sell, slow-jamming the news. A major bridge in Los Angeles is closed for demolition. But to bring it down safely, the 101 Freeway that runs under it had to be shut down this weekend. Standing in front of the bridge, backed by the Roosevelt High School jazz band, he delivered his message to the city on his Facebook page.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

ERIC GARCETTI: Hey, Los Angeles. As Angelinos, we're always on the move. But this weekend, we're shutting down the 101 to rebuild the Sixth Street Bridge. We call it the 101 Slow Jam.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Singing) So that's my friends.

MARTIN: You're listening to NPR News.

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