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Donald Trump Repeats Choice Language That Insulted Ted Cruz
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Donald Trump Repeats Choice Language That Insulted Ted Cruz

Politics

Donald Trump Repeats Choice Language That Insulted Ted Cruz

Donald Trump Repeats Choice Language That Insulted Ted Cruz
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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/466108280/466108281" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The top two finishers in the Republican caucuses in Iowa — Ted Cruz and Donald Trump — made their closing pitches in New Hampshire, but to a very different electorate.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And now for the latest on the Republican race in New Hampshire. Of course, it's been Donald Trump at the top of the polls, comfortably ahead, going into today's vote. That has not changed, even after his upset loss to Senator Ted Cruz in Iowa. And last night, Trump found one more opportunity to deliver some choice language. NPR's Sarah McCammon reports from Manchester.

SARAH MCCAMMON, BYLINE: Donald Trump showed up last night for his final rally before the New Hampshire primary more than half an hour late thanks to a snowstorm pounding the region. He hopes it doesn't keep his supporters away from the polls.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

DONALD TRUMP: I have never seen anything like it. It cannot be like this tomorrow. But I think it's going to be fine.

MCCAMMON: As the crowd cheered and applauded, Trump repeated some of his favorite themes from this campaign, promising to get tough on immigration and terrorism. He also took a swipe at several of his rivals for the Republican nomination, including Texas Senator Ted Cruz, who beat him in Iowa.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

TRUMP: You heard the other night at debate, they asked Ted Cruz - serious question - well, what do you think of waterboarding? Is it OK? And honestly, I thought he'd say absolutely. And he didn't. He said, well, it's...

MCCAMMON: Then, Trump was interrupted by a woman in the audience who used a word we can't repeat to describe Cruz as a wimp.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

TRUMP: You're not allowed to say - and I never expect to hear that from you again. She said - I never expect to hear that from you again - she said he's a [expletive]. That's terrible.

MCCAMMON: Trump added that he knew he'd get in trouble with the press unless he reprimanded the woman.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

TRUMP: So I want to just tell you right now, ma'am, you're reprimanded, OK?

MCCAMMON: Meanwhile, Ted Cruz has also been campaigning in New Hampshire much of the last week.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

TED CRUZ: And I will say I'm particularly glad to see the snow outside. You know, it's not a New Hampshire primary without snow falling.

MCCAMMON: Despite the fact that the politics are very different than in Iowa, the Texas senator reminded a crowd at a restaurant in Raymond yesterday of what he called an incredible victory just a week ago.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

CRUZ: And they all predicted someone else was going to win. The one thing they didn't count on was the actual voters.

MCCAMMON: By the end of today, it will again be clear what the actual voters have to say. Sarah McCammon, NPR News, Manchester.

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