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Letters: Presidential Election Coverage

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Letters: Presidential Election Coverage

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Letters: Presidential Election Coverage

Letters: Presidential Election Coverage

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NPR's Ari Shapiro and Kelly McEvers read listener comments and one small correction.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Time now for a quick look at your letters - first, a correction. In our story Friday about the unemployment rate among African-Americans, we misidentified an economist with the Economic Policy Institute. She is Valerie Wilson, not Valerie Johnson (ph). We regret the error.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

And now a letter that struck a chord with us. Tonight, every news outlet, including this one, will be obsessing over vote totals from towns like Sargent's Purchase and Lempster for the New Hampshire primaries.

SHAPIRO: Then there are people like Kate Melby of Petoskey, Mich. She wrote, my heart sinks every time I go to turn on my radio and remember it's an election year. I would vote for brief coverage of major events in the election and perhaps a weekly update on each candidate's strategy and poll numbers but not a daily hashing over of the nuances of everyone's strategy, polling data, historical comparisons and media coverage, she writes. Please cover all things in election years.

MCEVERS: We see what you did there. Thanks, Kate. Keep your comments coming. You can write to us by visiting npr.org. Click on contact at the very, very bottom of the page.

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