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Syrian Doctor Casts Doubt On Proposed Pause In Fighting

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Syrian Doctor Casts Doubt On Proposed Pause In Fighting

Middle East

Syrian Doctor Casts Doubt On Proposed Pause In Fighting

Syrian Doctor Casts Doubt On Proposed Pause In Fighting

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/466584896/466584897" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Dr. Osama Abo El Ezz is a general surgeon at a hospital in Aleppo, Syria. He says the humanitarian situation is grim and doesn't believe the cease fire will change anything. Nevertheless, he says he will keep working in Aleppo.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Earlier today, we called Dr. Osama Abo El Ezz, who is now on the Syrian-Turkish border. Abo El Ezz is a general surgeon at a hospital in the Syrian city of Aleppo, where there's intense fighting. He left the city four days ago. He says people there desperately need food, water and fuel, and they doubt the deal negotiated in Munich will bring much relief.

OSAMA ABO EL EZZ: Most of people think what I think - it's just break, and then Russia and the Assad regime will continue attacking Aleppo.

MCEVERS: Russia and the Assad regime will continue attacking Aleppo, he says. He says there will be more refugees, more deaths, more of what he calls sad stories, and he thinks Aleppo eventually will fall to Assad's forces.

ABO EL EZZ: I'm worried about my people, about the children, about the situation. Not for myself, but I'm very hopeless for this war.

MCEVERS: But Dr. Osama Abo El Ezz says he'll keep working at the hospital. He's heading back to Aleppo tomorrow.

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