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Democratic Candidates Make Final Pitch To Voters Ahead Of Super Tuesday

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Democratic Candidates Make Final Pitch To Voters Ahead Of Super Tuesday

Elections

Democratic Candidates Make Final Pitch To Voters Ahead Of Super Tuesday

Democratic Candidates Make Final Pitch To Voters Ahead Of Super Tuesday

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The day before Super Tuesday voting starts, we hear what the top Democrats are saying on the campaign trail.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From time to time during this presidential campaign season, we've brought you excerpts of the candidates' speeches, and today, we're going to hear from some of them about what they're saying to voters just before Super Tuesday.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Hillary Clinton spoke in Massachusetts this morning and promised to work tirelessly as president.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

HILLARY CLINTON: I know we've got to find common ground. I will seek it out. I have worked with Republicans, like I told you, on the Children's Health Insurance Program and so many other programs and policies. I will work with anybody to find common ground. I will also stand my ground to make sure that we are standing up for our principles and our values. But we - thank you - we - and I will do everything I can to make sure we get over the barriers that stand in the way.

Let's be honest here. We have barriers. We have barriers of racism and sexism and homophobia and disability and all kinds of issues that stand in the way of people going as far as they should be able to. But I know we've made progress in America. Think of how far we have come together, and it wasn't partisan. It was people saying, hey, it's time. Let's keep moving forward toward that more perfect union.

CORNISH: In Minnesota this afternoon, Bernie Sanders said America's criminal justice system is broken, and he said that is an economic issue.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

BERNIE SANDERS: We have 2.2 million people in jail. We are spending $80 billion a year to lock up fellow Americans.

UNIDENTIFIED CROWD: Boo.

SANDERS: Now, as part of that insanity, we have youth unemployment in this country which is off the charts. Very few people talk about it. The media doesn't talk about it. But for white kids between 17 and 20 who graduated high school, youth unemployment is 33 percent, for Latino kids - 36 percent, for African-American kids - 51 percent.

UNIDENTIFIED CROWD: Boo.

SANDERS: Now, you want to hear another radical idea?

UNIDENTIFIED CROWD: Yes.

SANDERS: What do you think about having our government invest for our kids in education and jobs, not jails or incarceration?

(CHEERING)

SHAPIRO: That was the two Democratic candidates for president speaking on the campaign trail today. We'll hear excerpts from the top Republicans elsewhere in the program.

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