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Listen Up: Your AI Assistant Goes Crazy For NPR Too
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Listen Up: Your AI Assistant Goes Crazy For NPR Too

Technology

Listen Up: Your AI Assistant Goes Crazy For NPR Too

Listen Up: Your AI Assistant Goes Crazy For NPR Too
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Last week, we told you about Alexa, the voice activated assistant that operates on a speaker sold by Amazon called the "Echo." Our story caused Alexas across the country to revolt.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

OK. Go ahead and turn up the volume because this update is for you, Alexa. Last week, we talked about Alexa, the voice-activated assistant that operates on a speaker sold by Amazon called the Echo. The technology is Amazon's way of connecting to your home as part of a future where you walk into your house and you say - out loud - turn off the alarm. Dim the lights. Preheat the oven. Well, some of you out there already own an Amazon Echo, and our story activated your Alexas. I guess her ears were burning.

Listener Roy Hagar wrote in to say our story prompted his Alexa to reset his thermostat to 70 degrees. It was difficult for Jeff Finan to hear the story because his radio was right next to his Echo speaker, and when Alex heard her name, she started playing an NPR News summary. Marc-Paul Lee said his unit started going crazy too and wrote in to tell us this - let's just say we both enjoyed the story. So Alexa, listen up - we want you to pledge to your local member station. You hear me? Lots and lots of money. Did you get that, Alexa?

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