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Washington, D.C., Parked In Second Place For Worst Traffic

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Washington, D.C., Parked In Second Place For Worst Traffic

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Washington, D.C., Parked In Second Place For Worst Traffic

Washington, D.C., Parked In Second Place For Worst Traffic

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/470635740/470635741" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

NPR's Renee Montagne leaves her West Coast post to host in D.C. this week. That means she's hopping from the worst commute in the country to the second worst.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne with news that some things never change. Los Angeles has the worst traffic in the country. Washington, D.C. is second. That's according to the data company Inrix.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Wait. Hold on a second, Renee. You deal with the worst traffic in the country, and this week you flew all the way across the country to host our show from the second worst?

MONTAGNE: Well, yes, I guess I did. But switching from a midnight commute to a 3 a.m. drive to work is nice. And for all of you stuck in traffic, enjoy listening to MORNING EDITION.

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