NPR logo
Panel Round Two
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/471006877/471091868" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Panel Round Two

Panel Round Two

Panel Round Two
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/471006877/471091868" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

More questions for the panel...Mad Diagnosis, The Art of Illusion

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT... DON’T TELL ME, the NPR news quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis. We are playing this week with Tom Bodett, Peter Grosz and Marina Franklin. And here again is your host at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Bill.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: In just a minute, Bill turns to a life of rhyme. It's the Listener Limerick Challenge. If you'd like to play, give us a call at 1-888-WAIT-WAIT. That's 1-888-924-8924. Right now panel, some more questions for you from the week's news. Peter, according to a British medical journal - the British Medical Journal - doctors tend to misdiagnose patients if those patients are what?

PETER GROSZ: Stabbing them.

(LAUGHTER)

GROSZ: If those...

SAGAL: You're actually close. Back off a little bit from stabbing.

GROSZ: If patients are screaming at them.

SAGAL: Yeah, if they're rude.

GROSZ: OK, if they're rude.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: If they were rude, you have a 42 percent higher chance of being misdiagnosed by your doctor.

GROSZ: That's stupid.

SAGAL: Exactly.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So if you give your doctor grief about having to wait two hours to see him for just five minutes in how cold his hands are, don't be surprised if the doctor then tells you you're dying of plague and leaves. According to the study, the extra effort doctors spend on rude patients distracts them from making sense of all the clinical data. So be nice to your doctor and ask for a second opinion, you know?

MARINA FRANKLIN: But what if they're rude?

SAGAL: Then they're doctors...

FRANKLIN: There's no Yelp for doctors.

TOM BODETT: Right.

SAGAL: Yeah. Just consider the surgical instrument they leave in your torso a special parting gift, you know?

(LAUGHTER)

GROSZ: There is Yelp for doctors, though.

FRANKLIN: Is there.

SAGAL: Absolutely, yeah.

GROSZ: I think you can Yelp doctors. Yeah, do it. Get on there.

SAGAL: So if you're a doctor and there are Yelp reviews of doctors and you're sensitive to your Yelp reviews, your incentive as a doctor is to be either really, really great to your patients or kill them.

(LAUGHTER)

GROSZ: This doctor has no Yelp reviews - that's right.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Peter, people tend to complain that Congress doesn't do anything important. But Rep. Pete sessions is proving them all wrong with a new bill he has introduced that would declare what a national treasure?

GROSZ: Congress.

SAGAL: That would be awesome. I don't think it would pass.

GROSZ: His wife?

SAGAL: No, that would be gracious.

GROSZ: Yeah. May I have a hint, please?

SAGAL: Yeah, it's like abracadabra, legislative dysfunction is gone.

GROSZ: He would declare magic...

SAGAL: Yes.

GROSZ: ...A national treasure?

SAGAL: Magic...

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: ...A national treasure and valued art form.

(LAUGHTER)

GROSZ: Wow, I did not think there was a way for Congress to get less popular.

SAGAL: Yes.

(LAUGHTER)

GROSZ: So they hook themselves up with magicians.

SAGAL: Yes, I know. Rep. Sessions and six other Republicans introduced this bill. It would categorize magic acts as, quote, "a rare and valuable art form and a national treasure," unquote. David Copperfield is a sponsor of the bill. Plus - and I swear this is true - a guy back in Texas who is both a Republican politician and a practicing magician who performs as Clinky the Magic Clown...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And the idea is that if magic is declared to be art, magicians can qualify for government grants.

GROSZ: Oh, my God.

SAGAL: So that means Lockheed is going to start making $4 million top hats and the rabbits will explode while still inside.

(LAUGHTER)

FRANKLIN: Well, did you see the video with the - I think it was the baboon? It went viral. And some magician, he did magic and he - the monkey was, like (imitating surprise) you know, like, really surprised. So maybe they're onto something.

SAGAL: The magician was, like, finally someone who's impressed.

(LAUGHTER)

GROSZ: But even then, the female baboons were, like, no, we're not that interested.

(LAUGHTER)

GROSZ: [Expletive] every species, none of the females are impressed with my magic.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MAGIC")

PILOT: (Singing) Oh, oh, it's magic you know, never believe it's not so. It's magic you know, never believe...

Copyright © 2016 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.