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First And Last Two Letters Are Key To Solve This Puzzle That's Not So Easy
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First And Last Two Letters Are Key To Solve This Puzzle That's Not So Easy

First And Last Two Letters Are Key To Solve This Puzzle That's Not So Easy

First And Last Two Letters Are Key To Solve This Puzzle That's Not So Easy
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/471102829/471161730" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Sunday Puzzle. i
NPR
Sunday Puzzle.
NPR

On-air challenge:

Take the category, then name something in it whose first two letters are the last two letters of the category's name.

For example: Author > (George) Orwell.

1. Beatle

2. Disney musical

3. Letter of the Greek alphabet

4. Country in Africa

5. Make of auto

6. Make of automobile

7. An Obama

8. Salad green

9. Racehorse

10. Municipal official

11. Norse explorer

12. Bridge

13. Ocean

14. Best Picture

15. Summer Olympics host

Last week's challenge, from listener Mike Reiss, who is a former writer and producer for The Simpsons: Take the name of a well-known actress. Her first name starts with the three-letter abbreviation for a month. Replace this with the three-letter abbreviation of a different month, and you'll get the name of a famous poet. Who are these two people?

Answer: Julianne Moore, Marianne Moore

Winner: Sara Hindsley of Greenbelt, MD.

Next week's challenge, from listener Andrew Chaikin of San Francisco: Think of a common nine-letter word that contains five consecutive consonants. Take three consecutive consonants out of these five and replace them with vowels to form another common nine-letter word. What is it?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday, March 24 at 3 p.m. EDT.

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