NPR logo
Using DNA Matching To Crack Down On Dog Droppings
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/471958024/471958025" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Using DNA Matching To Crack Down On Dog Droppings

Science

Using DNA Matching To Crack Down On Dog Droppings

Using DNA Matching To Crack Down On Dog Droppings
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/471958024/471958025" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An apartment building in Chicago wants to fine dog poop pickup scofflaws by using DNA to track down the offending canines and their masters.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The pooch did it, but now a Chicago apartment building will use sophisticated biotechnology to figure out which one. Management of the Luxe apartment buildings says too many residents neglect to pick up after their dogs when they walk them. And I don't mean the dog hair.

The Greystar management company had told residents they must swab their pets' cheeks to get a saliva sample that will be used to set up a DNA database of all the building's dogs. If management discovers a spot of canine feculence, they will test it for DNA to identify the dog and its negligent owner. The resident would be fined $250 for the offending excreta. Technology that's used to exonerate people who've been unjustly convicted will now track down dog droppings scofflaws.

Copyright © 2016 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.