NPR logo
A Pair Of Fivers Holds The Key To Each Of This Week's Little Riddles
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/471979694/472035977" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
A Pair Of Fivers Holds The Key To Each Of This Week's Little Riddles

A Pair Of Fivers Holds The Key To Each Of This Week's Little Riddles

A Pair Of Fivers Holds The Key To Each Of This Week's Little Riddles
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/471979694/472035977" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Sunday Puzzle. i
NPR
Sunday Puzzle.
NPR

On-air challenge: Every answer is a five-letter word said twice, in two different meanings. Answer the clues to get the phrases.

For example: Device for moving Raggedy Ann and similar toys —> DOLLY DOLLY.

Last week's challenge, from listener Andrew Chaikin of San Francisco: Think of a common nine-letter word that contains five consecutive consonants. Take three consecutive consonants out of these five and replace them with vowels to form another common nine-letter word. What is it?

Answer: Strengths, strenuous.

Winner: Robert Schwartz of Atlanta.

Next week's challenge: The University Press of New England has just published a book by Boston College professor Paul Lewis, called The Citizen Poets of Boston: A Collection of Forgotten Poems, 1789-1820. It has a chapter devoted to puzzles in poetic form. Most of the puzzles are explained — but one puzzle never had a printed answer.

I'd like to see if the collective brainpower of NPR listeners can be brought to bear to clear up this mystery. It's a two-line verse from the Nov. 12, 1803, issue of the Boston Weekly Magazine:

I am both man and woman too,
And go to school as good boys do.

If you can solve this riddle, let us know. I'll select what I think is the best answer that's submitted. If no one sends what I judge to be the intended answer, then I'll pick what I consider the most ingenious one, whether it's "correct" or not.

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday, March 31, at 3 p.m. ET.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.