WOOP, There It Is! 4 Steps To Achieve Your Goals Positive thinking feels good but it may actually stop you from achieving your goals. This week, we discuss a different approach called WOOP.
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WOOP, There It Is! 4 Steps To Achieve Your Goals

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WOOP, There It Is! 4 Steps To Achieve Your Goals

WOOP, There It Is! 4 Steps To Achieve Your Goals

WOOP, There It Is! 4 Steps To Achieve Your Goals

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/477379965/477383054" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
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Psychologist Gabriele Oettingen has found there can be a big downside to positive fantasizing.
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If you can dream it, you can do it, right? Right? Well ... not so fast. While fantasizing feels good and believing in yourself is surely better than not, research shows that keeping your head in the clouds can keep you, er, from reaching the stars. This week Shankar talks with psychologist Gabriele Oettingen, author of Rethinking Positive Thinking: Inside The New Science Of Motivation.

Through the years, Oettingen has studied dieters, students, job seekers, love seekers, people recovering from physical injuries, and other strivers. She's found they all have something in common: Those who have stronger, more positive fantasies about reaching their goals are actually less likely to achieve them. They lose fewer pounds, earn worse grades, receive fewer job offers, stay lonely longer, recover from injury more slowly.

But there is a way to reach more of our goals and make our wildest (realistic) dreams a reality. It's called WOOP, or Wish Outcome Obstacle Plan.

The Hidden Brain Podcast is hosted by Shankar Vedantam and produced by Kara McGuirk-Alison, Maggie Penman and Max Nesterak. Special thanks this week to Daniel Shuhkin. To subscribe to our newsletter, click here. You can also follow us on Twitter @hiddenbrain, @karamcguirk, @maggiepenman and @maxnesterak, and listen for Hidden Brain stories every week on your local public radio station.