Ancient Pay Stub Shows Workers Were Paid In Beer The British Museum has a 5,000-year-old tablet from the ancient Mesopotamian city of Uruk that is likely a pay stub. Historians say beer at that time was thick and starchy — basically liquid bread.
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Ancient Pay Stub Shows Workers Were Paid In Beer

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Ancient Pay Stub Shows Workers Were Paid In Beer

Ancient Pay Stub Shows Workers Were Paid In Beer

Ancient Pay Stub Shows Workers Were Paid In Beer

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484129432/484129434" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The British Museum has a 5,000-year-old tablet from the ancient Mesopotamian city of Uruk that is likely a pay stub. Historians say beer at that time was thick and starchy — basically liquid bread.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Think your bosses don't pay you enough? Well, imagine if you could be paid entirely in beer. The British Museum has got its hands on a 5,000-year-old pay stub from ancient Mesopotamia. It recorded the amount of beer paid to a worker as income. This practice was not uncommon in the ancient world. It happened in ancient Egypt as well. But think again before you get too envious. Historians say this brew was thick and starchy, basically liquid bread. It's MORNING EDITION.

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