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Not My Job: NASA's Charles Bolden Gets Quizzed On 'Charles In Charge'

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Not My Job: NASA's Charles Bolden Gets Quizzed On 'Charles In Charge'

Not My Job: NASA's Charles Bolden Gets Quizzed On 'Charles In Charge'

Not My Job: NASA's Charles Bolden Gets Quizzed On 'Charles In Charge'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/486890616/487161674" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Brian van der Brug/AP
NASA Administrator Charles Bolden at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., in 2012.
Brian van der Brug/AP

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden flew four times on the space shuttle and was the first voice to be broadcast from Mars.

We've invited him to play a game called "You're not Charles in Charge — he is!" Click the audio link above to hear Bolden answer three questions about the remarkable career of actor and Republican National Convention speaker Scott Baio.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

And now the game where people who have traveled many miles in their journey of life somehow end up with us. It's called Not My Job. Charles Bolden is a Marine and he became an astronaut who flew four times in the space shuttle. Now he's in charge of all of NASA. And this is interesting - his was the first voice to be broadcast to Mars. So if any Martians are listening right now they're going, oh, that guy.

(APPLAUSE, LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Charles Bolden, welcome to WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME.

CHARLES BOLDEN: Thank you. Good to be here. Thank you.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: So let's pick up on that right away. It is true that your voice was the first broadcast to Mars.

BOLDEN: Actually from Mars.

SAGAL: From Mars?

BOLDEN: Yeah.

SAGAL: Oh, how did that work?

BOLDEN: We sent the file to Mars, to the Curiosity Rover.

SAGAL: Yeah.

BOLDEN: And then when Curiosity woke up, it was asked to send my voice back.

SAGAL: Really? And what did you say from Mars?

BOLDEN: I have no idea.

SAGAL: You don't know?

BOLDEN: No. I don't remember.

ROXANNE ROBERTS: Really?

SAGAL: You're...

BOLDEN: It was like we...

SAGAL: You recorded the...

BOLDEN: ...Come in peace or something like that.

SAGAL: Yeah, I understand.

(LAUGHTER)

BOLDEN: My wife is in the audience somewhere and she says dog gone it, you can't find your way out here. And now you can't remember what you said from Mars.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Yeah.

TOM BODETT: Yeah. That's like you ask Neil Armstrong what he said on the moon. And he says I don't know, something about walking.

SAGAL: I don't remember.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So this is what we were told, that in your career you've been a Marine pilot and an astronaut and you did not want to be either of those things.

BOLDEN: Correct.

SAGAL: Now...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...it has been my understanding that those things are actually quite hard to become.

BOLDEN: Correct.

SAGAL: So how do you stumble into that?

BOLDEN: It's really not a joke, but I used to say, you know, my mother always taught me that, you know, just don't be a fool about things you decide you want to do. So flying was inherently dangerous, and I did not want to do that. And then I married the most beautiful woman in the world who is my wife now of - I would say how many years except then she'll be angry because I said that.

(LAUGHTER)

BOLDEN: You all will be impressed with how long she has stuck with me.

BODETT: Right.

(LAUGHTER)

BOLDEN: But I would rather have you guess than have me in trouble.

SAGAL: OK.

(LAUGHTER)

BOLDEN: And so...

SAGAL: Let's just - a long and successful marriage.

BOLDEN: ...She did not...

SAGAL: You met your wife...

BOLDEN: She did not enjoy the prospect of me going to Vietnam and defying the law of averages for the life expectancy of a second lieutenant.

SAGAL: Right.

BOLDEN: So she said why don't we go to Pensacola and you go to flight school? I said but I don't want to fly. And she kept saying that over and over and over and I found out during our three-day war at the end of my six months of training that I really did not like crawling around in the mud.

SAGAL: Right.

BOLDEN: And it was the first time that I learned in my marriage that if your wife says do something, she's probably right.

SAGAL: Right.

(APPLAUSE)

BOLDEN: So we went to Pensacola.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Did her wishes have anything to do with you eventually leaving the planet?

(LAUGHTER)

BOLDEN: I need to - I never thought of that.

SAGAL: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

BOLDEN: I - oh.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Charlie, I've got to ask you, when are we really going to Mars?

BOLDEN: We're going to Mars in the 2030s. So we've got the vehicle called - we're going to name it but right now we call it the Space Launch System. It's a heavy lift launch vehicle.

SAGAL: Right.

BOLDEN: And so we're going to fly in 2018. It won't be - have a - it won't have a crew on it.

SAGAL: Right.

BOLDEN: So the first first flight in 2018 will be a non-crewed mission. It'll go out around the moon and come back. We'll check it all out and make sure everything is good. The next flight will have a crew.

SAGAL: Right.

BOLDEN: And then for about 10 years, we're going to work - go back into the area around the moon so we can make sure the technology to go to Mars is really good...

SAGAL: Yeah.

BOLDEN: ...Because when you go to the moon, you're a couple of days away from Earth.

SAGAL: Right.

BOLDEN: You can be rescued if you need it. You go to Mars, you're eight months one way.

SAGAL: Yeah.

BOLDEN: And there is no pizza delivery man coming.

SAGAL: Right.

(LAUGHTER)

PAULA POUNDSTONE: I'll tell you something. I want to go to another planet so badly...

BODETT: Yeah.

ROBERTS: Really?

POUNDSTONE: ...That even - oh, yes.

BODETT: Yeah.

POUNDSTONE: That even though this is a radio show, I'm going to make this noise until you say yes (imitating high-pitched tone).

BOLDEN: Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Where...

POUNDSTONE: Man, you cracked pretty fast for a marine.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: I heard...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Charles Bolden, we are delighted to have you with us. And we have invited you here today to play a game we're calling...

BILL KURTIS: You're Not Charles In Charge, He Is.

SAGAL: So you're Charles in charge of NASA, but what do you know about the real Charles in charge? And that would be Scott Baio...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...Actor and, this really happened, featured speaker at the Republican National Convention. So we thought the time was clearly right for a quiz about his remarkable career. Answer two of these questions correctly, you'll win our prize for one of our listeners - Carl Kasell's voice on their voicemail. Bill, who is Charlie Bolden of NASA playing for?

KURTIS: Blake Redding of Washington, D.C.

SAGAL: All right, then.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: So ready to play? Ready to do this?

BOLDEN: Blake, I'm ready.

SAGAL: OK. What - do astronauts have to give, like, a verbal yes before launch? Do you have to, like, say yes, go?

BOLDEN: Yes.

SAGAL: And what is that phrase they use?

BOLDEN: They say - they ask the commander, are you ready? And they - we say roger.

SAGAL: Really, that's it?

BOLDEN: Yeah.

SAGAL: Roger?

BOLDEN: Or the crew is go.

SAGAL: OK.

BODETT: The crew is go.

SAGAL: I like that. OK.

BOLDEN: Yeah. The crew is the last persons - set of people - that say...

SAGAL: Right.

BOLDEN: ...We're go.

SAGAL: All right. Do they ever say I don't know. I'm having second thoughts about this?

(LAUGHTER)

BOLDEN: No.

SAGAL: All right.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So you're ready to go?

BOLDEN: The crew is ready.

SAGAL: There we go.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Mr. Baio got his first breakout role at the age of 15. It was the title role in that bizarre kids as gangsters movie "Bugsy Malone." And he landed a job as an unknown with his remarkable audition. How did he nail it? A - by performing perfectly Shakespeare's this sceptered isle this England speech from "Richard II." B - by simply looking at the director in his most smoldering, come-hither sexy glance...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...Or C - by reading the script, throwing it at the director and stomping out.

BOLDEN: C.

SAGAL: You're exactly right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

POUNDSTONE: Wow.

(APPLAUSE)

BOLDEN: That's exactly what I'd do.

SAGAL: Really?

BOLDEN: No. No.

SAGAL: You don't strike me as the...

BOLDEN: No. No.

SAGAL: ...Throw a thing and stomp off.

BOLDEN: I would not. No.

SAGAL: You were very confident though. You looked at me with the steely-eyed confidence of a Marine pilot and I was impressed.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: You knew this. All right. That was - you're right. He - the director was so impressed with his brash attitude that he got the part before he left the building. All right. Next question. In addition to his acclaimed run as Chachi on "Happy Days," Mr. Baio appeared in one of those classic after-school specials in 1980 about real problems kids might have. What was his episode called? Was it A - but those pants make me feel funny, B - the boy who drank too much, or C - are you there God? It's me, Scott Baio.

(LAUGHTER)

BOLDEN: Holy gimoley (ph).

UNIDENTIFIED AUDIENCE: B.

BOLDEN: B.

SAGAL: They're going for B.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: The boy who drank too much. You're right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

BOLDEN: Somebody said if you don't cheat, you're not trying.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Right. That's fine. Yeah, it was the boy who drank too much. It's about a boy who drinks too much.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: All right. You can go for perfect here. Mr. Baio's acting career did not end with "Charles In Charge," of course. He's remained busy in the decades since. For example, he did this - in 2007, he did a reality show called "Scott Baio Is 45...And Single." And he did another series the next year as kind of a sequel. What was that sequel reality series called? Was it A - "Scott Baio Is Looking For A Job Since The Last Thing Didn't Work Out...."

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...B - "Scott Baio Is 46 And Pregnant..."

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...Or C - "Scott Baio, Crappy Days?"

(LAUGHTER)

BOLDEN: OK. It's time to think about this. No, nobody?

(LAUGHTER)

BOLDEN: Let's just try B.

SAGAL: You're going to go for B. He's 46 and pregnant. It is, in fact, B.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: That's all right. You're OK. You're OK.

POUNDSTONE: Wow. That is...

SAGAL: The show is called - the follow-up to Scott" Baio's 45...And "Single was "Scott Baio Is 46 And Pregnant." To clarify, it was actually Mr. Baio's girlfriend who was pregnant. He's talented but not that talented.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Bill, how did NASA Administrator Charles Bolden do on our quiz?

KURTIS: Three right.

SAGAL: Well done.

BOLDEN: It's the team.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: I like hearing the lingo. And you can choose either the Marine Corps, you can choose the astronaut corps or you can choose NASA, how do you say excellent? How do you say, you know, very good?

BOLDEN: The standard old thing is A-OK. But we don't say that anymore.

SAGAL: Really?

BOLDEN: Yeah.

SAGAL: What do you say now?

BOLDEN: Excellent.

SAGAL: Excellent.

BOLDEN: Yeah.

SAGAL: Charlie Bolden is the administrator at NASA.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Charlie Bolden, thank you so much for being with us.

BOLDEN: Thank you.

SAGAL: What a pleasure. Ladies and gentleman, your NASA director.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: What a guy.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SAGAL: In just a minute, we put on our best leathers for the Listener Limerick Challenge game. Call 1-888-WAIT-WAIT to join us on the air. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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