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NAACP Chapter Responds To Charlotte Shooting Police Footage

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NAACP Chapter Responds To Charlotte Shooting Police Footage

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NAACP Chapter Responds To Charlotte Shooting Police Footage

NAACP Chapter Responds To Charlotte Shooting Police Footage

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Corine Mack is president of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg chapter of the NAACP. She tells NPR's Rachel Martin how her community is responding in the wake of the shooting of Keith Lamont Scott.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now we're joined by Corine Mack. She's the president of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg chapter of the NAACP.

Good morning. Thank you so much for being with us.

CORINE MACK: Good morning. Thank you for having me.

MARTIN: What did you learn from the footage that was released yesterday?

MACK: What I will say is that - first, let me say that I'm concerned that we didn't get all of the videos, number one. Number two - what I learned was that there is definitely a narrative being placed into the community that I think does more harm than good. We're not asking the CMPD to give us their position on the case. We're looking for all videos. There were some statements made initially by CMPD regarding the loss of life of Mr. Scott. And the videos don't meet the statements that were made. And that's what I learned.

MARTIN: You said there's a narrative that the police department is putting out there that you think is false. What is that?

MACK: Well not that it's false, that it's a concern - there was a long letter that was sent out by Chief Putney when he released those videos. That's the narrative I'm talking about. We're not asking for his narrative. We're asking for videos. That's it. We're not for still pictures of a gun in a holster because we don't know where that gun in a holster came from. We're asking for videos so that we all can see for ourselves exactly what happened on the day that Mr. Scott lost his life.

MARTIN: What effect will more transparency - if you get all the videos, what effect will that have on restoring what is, no doubt, broken trust between the police and the community there?

MACK: It will give us all an opportunity to see what they're seeing, period. So here's the problem - we were told one thing from the very first day. Now Keith Lamont Scott is being demonized, as so many African-Americans throughout the course of these days that we've had black men and women killed. Now he's a drug-toting - a drug addict who happened to be a gun-toting individual.

My concern is that every time we hear a story, the story is to demonize the victim. Keith Lamont Scott is dead. He can't speak for himself. So the only thing we have to see in those last moments of his life is the video, (unintelligible) why it's so important that we don't get anyone else's narrative. Let us see for ourselves, from every angle, what happened.

MARTIN: This is the first Sunday since Keith Lamont Scott's death. How will you, along with your community, mark this day?

MACK: Well, I'm going to spend my time at church because I need to be refilled. I definitely need to. I'm marking it as a day to continue to trust God that truth will prevail. God is not a liar. Man is. Man has proven over and over again that he's a liar. But God never lies, and I believe in his mercy and his grace.

MARTIN: Corine Mack is the president of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg chapter of the NAACP.

Thank you so much for taking the time to talk with us today.

MACK: Thank you. You have a blessed day.

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