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Hark! Who Goes There? Why, It's A Puzzle For A 'Guard'

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Hark! Who Goes There? Why, It's A Puzzle For A 'Guard'

Hark! Who Goes There? Why, It's A Puzzle For A 'Guard'

Hark! Who Goes There? Why, It's A Puzzle For A 'Guard'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/498984685/499042396" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sunday Puzzle. NPR hide caption

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Sunday Puzzle.

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On-air challenge: This is a game of categories based on the word "guard." For each category I give you, name something in it starting with each of the letters G-U-A-R-D.

For example, if the category were "Three-Syllable Girls' Names," you might say Gabrielle, Ursula, Andrea, Rosalind and Diana. Any answer that works is fine, and you can give the answers in any order.

This week's special guest: Savannah Guthrie, co-host of NBC's Today.

Next week's challenge: This is a two-week challenge. Take the digits 5, 4, 3, 2 and 1, in that order. Using those digits and the four arithmetic signs — plus, minus, times and divided by — you can get 1 with the sequence 5 - 4 + 3 - 2 - 1. You can get 2 with the sequence (5 - 4 + 3 - 2) x 1.

The question is ... how many numbers from 1 to 40 can you get using the digits 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 in that order along with the four arithmetic signs?

You can group digits with parentheses, as in the example. There are no tricks to this, though. It's a straightforward puzzle. How many numbers from 1 to 40 can you get — and, specifically, what number or numbers can you not get? I'll reveal my solution next week.

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday, Oct. 27, at 3 p.m. ET.

Correction Oct. 23, 2016

In an earlier version of the audio, we incorrectly accepted the answer "Alexander" to the question about presidents' first names beginning with the letter 'A'. A corrected version of the audio aired in subsequent broadcast feeds and will be posted here.