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Remembering Actress Carrie Fisher

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Remembering Actress Carrie Fisher

Remembrances

Remembering Actress Carrie Fisher

Remembering Actress Carrie Fisher

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Actress Carrie Fisher died on Tuesday at the age of 60 after suffering a heart attack late last week. She will forever be remembered for the role she took when she was 19, Princess Leia in Star Wars.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

David, just yesterday you and I were talking about our mutual love for "Star Wars," right?

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Yeah.

MARTIN: And then came this very sad news that Carrie Fisher had died.

GREENE: Yeah, it's really sad. She suffered a heart attack Friday on this flight from London to LA. She died yesterday. She was 60 years old, and I had forgotten that she was only 19...

MARTIN: Yeah.

GREENE: ...When she got the part of Princess Leia.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "STAR WARS: EPISODE IV - A NEW HOPE")

CARRIE FISHER: (As Princess Leia Organa) This is some rescue. You came in here, but you didn't have a plan for getting out?

HARRISON FORD: (As Han Solo) He's the brains, sweetheart. What the hell are you doing?

FISHER: (As Princess Leia Organa) Somebody has to save our skins.

MARTIN: So cool to hear that. It was amazing as a kid to watch Carrie Fisher up there on the screen. She was this princess, but she wasn't wearing pink. She wasn't wearing a tiara. She was smart. She was tough, and she did not take any guff from all those men around her.

GREENE: Yeah. And I have to say as a little boy, I mean, these were some of the first movies I remember. And the image of a woman in charge on screen, I mean, that really made an imprint on me.

MARTIN: Yeah. So Carrie Fisher was on WHYY's Fresh Air just this past November actually, talking about her relationship with Princess Leia.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

FISHER: I like Princess Leia. I like how she handles things. I like how she treats people. She tells the truth. She, you know, gets what she wants done. The downside is the hair and some of the outfits.

GREENE: Carrie Fisher was also famous for the struggles that she faced in her life and being really public about her own battles with addiction and also mental illness.

MARTIN: Yeah. And I think that endeared her in a different way to her fans. She did this one-woman show based on her life story that I had seen, and it really shown a light on the darker parts of her life, which made other people facing the same things feel less alone. She tapped into her own life a lot creatively. Her book "Postcards From The Edge" was turned into a movie with Meryl Streep. And she had a new memoir, came out just last month based on the journal she kept when she was filming "Star Wars."

GREENE: And, of course, more "Star Wars." Fisher came back to "Star Wars" last year as General Leia in "The Force Awakens," which meant that an entirely new generation got to fall in love with her. She said she really got a kick out of seeing these people in Princess Leia costumes at sci-fi conventions.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

FISHER: My favorite one to see is the metal bikini on men.

TERRY GROSS, BYLINE: (Laughter).

FISHER: And that is what has been happening a lot.

GROSS: Is that a thing? That's a thing?

FISHER: Oh, absolutely, absolutely, a lot. And not thin men, by the way. So that makes me feel good about myself.

MARTIN: She a great sense of humor, too. Actress Carrie Fisher died yesterday. She was 60 years old.

(SOUNDBITE OF JOHN WILLIAMS SONG, "PRINCESS LEIA'S THEME")

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