Panel Round Two More questions for the panel...Screen Addiction, Double Oh! Seven, The Insecurminator
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Panel Round Two

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Panel Round Two

Panel Round Two

Panel Round Two

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More questions for the panel...Screen Addiction, Double Oh! Seven, The Insecurminator

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME, the NPR news quiz. We're playing this week with Negin Farsad, Tom Bodett and Adam Burke. And here again is your host at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Bill. Thanks, everybody.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: In just a minute, Bill kicks back with a Bartles and Jaymes rhyme cooler in our Listener Limerick Challenge.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: We had to reach back for that one.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: If you'd like to play, give us a call at 1-888-WAIT-WAIT. That's 1-888-924-8924. Right now, panel, some more questions for you from the week's news. Tom, some good news - apparently, teen drug use is down because it seems that teens would much rather do what?

TOM BODETT: I could only guess that they'd rather play video games, but...

SAGAL: Not quite. You're close, though.

BODETT: Just, you know, like, chill with their phones.

SAGAL: Exactly right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL RINGING)

BODETT: Yeah.

SAGAL: Drug use is down because smartphone use among teenagers is up.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: It's possible that kids don't do drugs because smartphones make them so happy. It's also possible that it's really hard to roll a joint with one hand.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Damn.

(APPLAUSE)

ADAM BURKE: How are they going to do the ad for it? This is your brain on drugs. This is your brain on Instagram.

(LAUGHTER)

BODETT: Right.

SAGAL: This is your brain with an antique filter on Instagram. Isn't it cool?

NEGIN FARSAD: You know, in my day, you would sneak out of your bedroom and try and make out with a boy like a normal person.

SAGAL: Right. Yeah.

FARSAD: And I'm very disappointed that they're spending all this time with their phone and not doing questionable stuff sexually.

SAGAL: Tom, sensitive topic here - there was a report on NPR - NPR...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...About the WeVibe brand Bluetooth-enabled vibrators. WeVibe got in trouble this week because it turns out the vibrators were doing what?

(LAUGHTER)

BODETT: Well, surveillance is...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Somewhere Kellyanne Conway just said, I told you, because, yes, that's the answer.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL RINGING)

BODETT: Oh.

SAGAL: The...

(LAUGHTER)

BODETT: Does - well, hold on - interesting - does that mean you can - it's recording personal data?

SAGAL: Let me explain.

BODETT: Yeah.

SAGAL: This actually - we've known this for a while. This week, they had to pay out, according to a judge, a settlement. So this is what's called the WeVibe, the smart vibrator. Those are the kind of sexual aids that always find a way to work in the fact that they went to Harvard.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So the way this one was worked is you operated it with your phone. You know, turn it on, turn it up - whatever. And it turns out that all that time that people were using them, the phones were secretly sending usage data back to the companies. So they could gather data on how often people used it and what they used it for and so on and so forth. The company says the data is secure.

BURKE: Did, like, mothers have access to this?

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Wait, is this why kids aren't doing drugs anymore?

BURKE: Right.

(LAUGHTER)

BODETT: You may be on to something.

SAGAL: Now, the company says that all this data is secure. There was, however, a pretty lame 20-minute report on your genitals on "Rachel Maddow" the other night, so...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: You know - you know they'd be giving this data out to law enforcement when they come to your house for, like - hello, you must be Mrs. Jones.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: We were told - we have it on good authority this was a good time.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Adam, researchers at MIT have developed a new robot. It's the first robot capable of what?

(LAUGHTER)

BURKE: Well, do they...

SAGAL: Move on. Move on.

(LAUGHTER)

BURKE: Laughing at jokes?

SAGAL: No. I'll give you a hint. It has a little face that's a screen, and it can blush.

BURKE: Oh, it's the first robot that gets embarrassed.

SAGAL: Exactly right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: MIT has designed a robot for the specific purpose of it getting embarrassed. It's called Baxter the Robot. And unlike other robots, when you drop it off at the airport, and you're like - have a nice flight - and it says, you, too, it realizes how stupid that sounded.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Oh, man. The whole flight, you're like, oh, man.

BURKE: There's so much to unpack in the story that you set up for that joke. It's amazing.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Yeah, I know.

BURKE: Why am I dropping him off at the - why am I dropping him off at the airport?

BODETT: Right.

BURKE: Where's my robot going?

(LAUGHTER)

BURKE: Do you have to pay more for a robot seat? What's going on?

BODETT: So is this the idea that this is how they learn? Like, they feel that - oh, I sense...

SAGAL: Well, yeah. Apparently, if they - if robots are going to successfully interact with humans, they're going to need to know when they've screwed up by human standards and react accordingly. So they want to make robots that are sensitive to that.

BURKE: Good news, everybody. We've created Catholic robots.

(LAUGHTER)

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