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Russia To Send Gun-Toting Humanoid Into Space

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Russia To Send Gun-Toting Humanoid Into Space

Space

Russia To Send Gun-Toting Humanoid Into Space

Russia To Send Gun-Toting Humanoid Into Space

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Russia's space-bound robot FEDOR, Final Experimental Demonstration Object Research, is being trained to shoot guns from both of its hands. An official says the robot is not a real-life Terminator.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. In the Cold War, the United States and Soviet Union competed to be first in space. Now the U.S. and Russia may, if they wish, compete for the deadliest robots. Russia is sending a humanoid called FEDOR into space. The deputy prime minister says this robot is being trained to shoot firearms. He insists this is not a real-life Terminator and will be of great practical significance. Because who among us could not use a gun-toting robot in space? It's MORNING EDITION.

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