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For The Baristas' Sake, Don't Get A Unicorn Frappuccino

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For The Baristas' Sake, Don't Get A Unicorn Frappuccino

Food

For The Baristas' Sake, Don't Get A Unicorn Frappuccino

For The Baristas' Sake, Don't Get A Unicorn Frappuccino

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/525010782/525010783" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

There's a trend of food with unicorn colors. A Starbucks employee posted a video saying he's "never been so stressed," making "unicorn Frappuccinos." He said he had sticky hands, clothes and hair.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. A Starbucks barista had enough serving unicorn food. There's a unicorn food craze, making food pink or sparkly. And Starbucks offered a pink, sparkly unicorn frappuccino. In Colorado, employee Braden Burson posted a video saying he's never been so stressed. Filling so many orders, he had sticky hands, clothes and hair. His complaint went all over the internet. Starbucks says it'll have a talk with him, but they have to thank him for the publicity. It's MORNING EDITION.

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