Sen. John Cornyn Drops Out Of Running For FBI Director Job; Merrick Garland To Remain A Judge Despite Republicans floating the idea of making Merrick Garland FBI director, people close to the judge say that's not happening. Garland was Obama's pick to the Supreme Court and never got a hearing.
NPR logo Cornyn Drops Out Of Running For FBI Director Job; Merrick Garland To Remain A Judge

Cornyn Drops Out Of Running For FBI Director Job; Merrick Garland To Remain A Judge

Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn of Texas pulled himself out of contention for FBI director Tuesday. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn of Texas pulled himself out of contention for FBI director Tuesday.

Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Updated at 2:44 p.m. ET

Neither Merrick Garland nor Sen. John Cornyn of Texas will be the new FBI director.

Two friends of Judge Merrick Garland who asked not to be named say he loves being a judge, and he intends to remain on the bench.

Merrick Garland was all smiles when meeting with senators last year when he was a Supreme Court nominee. Despite bipartisan acclaim, he never even got a hearing. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Merrick Garland was all smiles when meeting with senators last year when he was a Supreme Court nominee. Despite bipartisan acclaim, he never even got a hearing.

Susan Walsh/AP

This comes after word that Republican Senate leader Mitch McConnell recommended Garland to President Trump as a candidate for FBI director.

Garland was nominated to the Supreme Court by former President Barack Obama after Justice Antonin Scalia's death, but never received even a hearing from the GOP Senate that McConnell runs.

Cornyn pulled himself out of the running Tuesday, saying he believes the best way to serve the country is as a senator.

"Now more than ever the country needs a well-credentialed, independent FBI Director," Cornyn said. I've informed the administration that I'm committed to helping them find such an individual, and that the best way I can serve is continuing to fight for a conservative agenda in the U.S. Senate."

NPR's Domenico Montanaro contributed to this report.