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What's Next For Bill Cosby After Mistrial

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What's Next For Bill Cosby After Mistrial

Law

What's Next For Bill Cosby After Mistrial

What's Next For Bill Cosby After Mistrial

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NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks to famed attorney Gloria Allred about the fallout from the mistrial declared in the Bill Cosby trial. The prosecution promises to retry the case.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Bill Cosby, who has been accused by dozens of women of sexual assault, walked out of a courtroom yesterday after a jury could not agree about a case involving one of them, Andrea Constand. Constand says she was drugged and raped by Cosby at his home in 2004. The prosecution is promising to retry the case. We're joined now by lawyer Gloria Allred. She represents other women who say Cosby sexually assaulted them. Good morning.

GLORIA ALLRED: Good morning.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So why do you think the jury could not make a unanimous decision?

ALLRED: Well, obviously, it was - there was a split. We don't know what the split was because, apparently, that's confidential under Pennsylvania law. But, you know, who knows? Even though jurors are not supposed to speak about other jurors, that may end up leaking out.

The prosecution did not prove their case beyond a reasonable doubt. On the other hand, the defense also did not get an acquittal. And so this case is going to be tried again. I did represent one - the other accuser who was permitted to testify, Kelly Johnson. And I admire both Kelly and Andrea for their courage in testifying in such a high-profile case. And I've said, you know, we can never underestimate the blinding power of celebrity, but justice will come.

And I hope that in the next trial - and the prosecution has announced that it will try Mr. Cosby again - that the next time that the court is going to permit more prior-bad-acts witnesses to testify as the prosecution had requested for this trial. For the trial that just ended, the court only allowed one such, what we called, prior-bad-act witnesses to testify, rather than the 13 such witnesses, in other words, other accusers, which the prosecution wanted to call. So I believe that if the court allows more accusers to testify next time, it might make a difference.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: What might change the court's mind to make that happen?

ALLRED: Well, that's a good question because when the court denied the prosecution's request to have 13 testify and only allowed one, my client Ms. Johnson, the court did not state the reasons for the court's decision. So we don't know. And it is going to be the same judge next time from trial, Judge O'Neill. So I hope that the prosecution will renew their request, their motion. And we'll have to see, if they do, what the court decides.

Court has discretion. In other words, it could decide to allow other witnesses under Pennsylvania law. Often, other accusers are permitted. But we just don't know what the court will decide. And - well, I think it might make a difference.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Will the same lawyers represent the prosecution and the defense, as well, as they're having the same judge presiding?

ALLRED: You know, I - it's my understanding that that will be the case. I think the prosecution did an excellent job. District Attorney Steele and Deputy District attorney Christian Seddon (ph) and Deputy District Attorney Stewart Ryan - they really put on a strong case. But I know that we evaluate. That's what they've indicated they will do and see if there's something more that they can do. And so that's why I say that it's too early to celebrate, Mr. Cosby, because round 2 is just around the corner. And this time justice may prevail.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Gloria Allred, she represents more women who have accused Bill Cosby of sexual assault. Thank you very much for joining us today.

ALLRED: Thank you. Bye, bye.

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