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Panel Questions

Panel Questions

Panel Questions

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Viagra Falls

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Right now, panel, it is time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Faith, it is the end of an era. This fall's NFL broadcasts will no longer have ads for a product that has been supporting the league financially for 20 years. What's the product?

FAITH SALIE: Twenty years.

SAGAL: Twenty years.

SALIE: This makes me wonder how long Viagra and Cialis have been around.

SAGAL: You are - not wonder because that's the answer...

SALIE: Really?

SAGAL: ...Is Viagra, yeah.

SALIE: That thing has been going on for 20 years?

SAGAL: Twenty years.

SALIE: Then that pill works.

SAGAL: Yeah, of course, it does say on the label that if it lasts for 20 years, you should see a doctor.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: But this is true. For - 20 years have passed, hundreds of millions of dollars spent on ads during football games. And after all of that, Viagra is pulling out.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: They just aren't up for it any more.

SALIE: I mean, are there other advertisers who offer stiff competition?

SAGAL: For years, the makers of Viagra and other, quote, "ED" drugs reached their primary market by putting ads on NFL broadcasts, which apparently is the other thing older men do to get themselves excited. So there will be no more ads, no more throwing footballs through tires or people in mystifying outdoor separate bathtubs. No more beautiful women looking at the camera and saying, you disgust me.

SALIE: It's hard to penetrate that space, though. It's very expensive, right?

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It is. It is.

LUKE BURBANK: We'll just be over here if you need us.

(LAUGHTER)

BURBANK: Having dignity.

SAGAL: Now, you may say, why are they doing this? And the answer is because the patent on Viagra is about to expire.

SALIE: Wait, what does that mean?

SAGAL: It means...

SALIE: Wait, anybody can do it?

NEGIN FARSAD: It's means democratizing boners.

SAGAL: Exactly.

(LAUGHTER)

BURBANK: I feel like those commercials were, in a way, such a sad commentary on what the drug manufacturers think relationships look like in midlife and what arousal looks like 'cause it would always just come down to the wife doing one thing that was slightly surprising to the husband. And then he has a look in his eye like, it's go time.

There's one where they're at a concert together and she, like, turns his hat around. And he has a look like, it's sex time.

(LAUGHTER)

BURBANK: There's one where she pretends like she's going to dive off of a dock but she cannonballs, and, again, he gets the look. If this lady does anything surprising, he is ready to rock.

(SOUNDBITE OF GEORGE THOROGOOD AND THE DESTROYERS SONG, "BAD TO THE BONE")

SAGAL: Coming up, panelists pop the question. It's our Bluff the Listener game. Call 1-888-WAITWAIT to play. We'll be back in a minute with more WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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