NPR logo

Panel Questions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537314244/537416515" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Panel Questions

Panel Questions

Panel Questions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537314244/537416515" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Shadows and Foie gras; Don't Feed The Bears

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME, the NPR News quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis. We're playing this week with Faith Salie, Negin Farsad and Luke Burbank. And here again is your host at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thank you, everybody. Thank you so much. In just a minute, Bill puts the rhyme in the coconut in the Listener Limerick Challenge.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: If you'd like to play, give us a call at 1-888-WAIT-WAIT. That's 1-888-924-8924. Right now, panel, some more questions for you from the week's news. Negin, a restaurant in London is targeting the real reason people go out to eat. They're offering patrons what to go along with their food?

NEGIN FARSAD: I don't know. Is it something - it's not some other types of food, right?

(LAUGHTER)

FARSAD: Wait.

SAGAL: No. It's not like a dish from a better restaurant next door.

(LAUGHTER)

FARSAD: Are they offering like something to - like companionship?

(LAUGHTER)

FARSAD: Is everyone in London really lonely, and they just want someone to talk to at dinner?

SAGAL: Well, yes. But that's not what they're solving.

FARSAD: Oh.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: I'll give you a hint. Would you like to say cheese with that burger?

FARSAD: A photo?

SAGAL: I'm just going to give it to you. They're giving anyone who asks a lighting setup to take a better Instagram photo of their food.

FARSAD: Oh, yeah. Yeah.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: That makes sense to you, Negin? You do this? You take pictures of your food?

FARSAD: I occasionally dabble in the - I take some photos, and then I never post them because I feel ridiculous.

SAGAL: Yes, that's the appropriate choice.

FARSAD: And then I don't want to be judged for what I order. You know what I mean? Like, because I'm the kind of person that'll be, like, I'd like a pizza with extra cheese. And they'll be, like, we don't do extra cheese. And I'm, like, you know, I'll give you $500 for extra cheese. You know?

(LAUGHTER)

FARSAD: So, like, that's the kind of thing I don't need people knowing.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Well, this London...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...This London eatery is jumping on social media's obsession with food by offering diners a professional lighting kit so you can bore your Instagram followers with higher quality pictures of your food.

(LAUGHTER)

FARSAD: I took a photo recently because I wanted to do a little bit of a salad brag, like, an I-order-salads brag.

(LAUGHTER)

FARSAD: And I took the photo - we all do this, right?

LUKE BURBANK: I mean, it is - happy Prime week.

(LAUGHTER)

FARSAD: And I took the photo but, like, it was a salad that had, like, a large, like, fried chicken on top of it.

(LAUGHTER)

FARSAD: And so, like, I didn't know. That's one of those where I was, like, I don't know if this works.

FAITH SALIE: So it was a humble brag.

FARSAD: It was. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.

SAGAL: But restaurants are actually accommodating people. Like, I went to this great restaurant in New York, where they specialize in a whole fried chicken. It was amazing. And they brought it out. And it was this whole fried chicken, this whole brown, delicious, crispy thing. And I was looking at it and going, that's nice, but how are we going to eat it, it being a whole chicken? And they said, well, we'll carve it up. We just brought it out so you can take a picture.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And we did. We all stood up behind it.

SALIE: And you did.

SAGAL: And we took a picture standing with it as if we had hunted and killed it just then.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Like, it was our trophy. We stalked the fried bird.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Luke, we read this week about a teenager who was camping in Colorado. He says he woke up in his tent when he heard a crunching sound. And the sound turned out to be what?

BURBANK: His skull in the jaws of a bear.

SAGAL: That's exactly right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: We've all been there, right?

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: You wake up, a bear is chewing on your head.

BURBANK: The hilarious part was that the bear took a picture of the kid's head....

(LAUGHTER, APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Posted it on Snarlchat.

(LAUGHTER)

BURBANK: Yeah.

SAGAL: Bears use for their social media. And that's what gave him a chance to escape.

BURBANK: Right.

SAGAL: While the bear was taking a picture for his social media...

FARSAD: Setting up the lighting.

SAGAL: ...Of his meal - of the head that he was about to eat. No, actually, the guy - apparently, he sort of tugged on the bear's ear and punched the bear until it ran away. And, you know, he annoyed the bear. The bear was, like, oh, I hate this.

FARSAD: That's all you have to do - is punch a bear, and then they'll just run away?

SALIE: Well, plus the bear discovered the guy's head wasn't fried.

SAGAL: Yeah, that's true.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: But the thing is that the bear, like, did his best to kill him. And he fought the bear off, and he survived. So now he and the bear will be engaged in this lifelong battle until they finally have a battle to the death in the eighth movie.

(LAUGHTER)

BURBANK: Yeah. The guy's going to get on the subway in three years, and there's just going to be a really round guy in a raincoat...

SAGAL: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

BURBANK: ...In the corner. It's the bear.

(SOUNDBITE OF JERRY GARCIA AND DAVID GRISMAN'S "TEDDY BEARS' PICNIC")

Copyright © 2017 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.