Sunday Puzzle: The Familiarity Of Stressed Syllables Bobbie Wilson of La Crosse, Wis., plays the puzzle with Puzzlemaster Will Shortz while celebrating National Cheesecake Day.
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Sunday Puzzle: The Familiarity Of Stressed Syllables

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Sunday Puzzle: The Familiarity Of Stressed Syllables

Sunday Puzzle: The Familiarity Of Stressed Syllables

Sunday Puzzle: The Familiarity Of Stressed Syllables

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/539812506/540359438" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sunday Puzzle. NPR hide caption

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Sunday Puzzle.

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On-air challenge: Every answer today is a familiar two-word phrase or name with the stress pattern da-DAH-da da-DAH-da.

Ex. Appearing naked in a public setting —> INDECENT EXPOSURE

  1. State capital east of Indianapolis, Ind.
  2. Mountain range in the Far West
  3. Song in The Lion King with a Swahili title
  4. Treaty respecting the humane treatment of P.O.W.'s
  5. Material for a pharaoh's scroll
  6. Longtime popular car from Japan
  7. Person with a government post gotten by ballot, not appointment
  8. Medical term for chest pain
  9. White House daughter from 2009 to 2017

Last week's challenge: What common three-word expression — 14 letters in all — has only N and G as consonants, and otherwise is all vowels?

Answer: Going, Going, Gone!

Winner: Bobbie Wilson of La Crosse, Wis.

Next week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from listener Joe Krozel of Creve Coeur, Mo., and it might require a little research. There is a city somewhere in the United States with a population of about 24,000 people. Change the last letter in the name of its state. If you now read the name of the city plus the altered name of its state together, the result is a palindrome — that is, it reads backward and forward the same. What city is it?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you at 3 p.m. ET on Thursday, August 3.