Panel Questions Hollywood Bathroom Breaks; Mercedes S(hiatsu) Class
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Panel Questions

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Panel Questions

Panel Questions

Panel Questions

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Hollywood Bathroom Breaks; Mercedes S(hiatsu) Class

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Right now, panel, it is time for you to answer some questions about the rest of the week's news. Paula, a new app is all the rage among moviegoers. Just turn it on and it tells you when you should do what?

PAULA POUNDSTONE: Go to the bathroom.

SAGAL: Exactly right, Paula.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: We've all been there. You're watching a movie. That Coke you drink is pressing in the bladder, but you don't want to miss the good parts. Now, most people know this is why you buy the large bucket of popcorn and keep it right there. But...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: But now there's this phone app. It's called RunPee. And you...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: As the movie starts, you tell it what movie you're seeing and hit it when it starts. And it will buzz whenever it's a good time to exit without missing anything.

ROY BLOUNT JR: Oh, I see. I see.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And this really beats the company's first idea, just opening a theater where every seat is a toilet.

(LAUGHTER)

ALONZO BODDEN: So what if you're at a horrible movie? Does it just say, anytime?

SAGAL: Yeah, exactly.

(LAUGHTER)

BODDEN: Like, you're at, "Fast And Furious 8," they're like, go for it. You won't miss it.

SAGAL: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Doesn't matter. Just get out now while you're still sane. This app is going to make such a difference to people - no longer have to be that guy who's like, oh, I missed that one scene. Who did Sophie end up choosing?

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Too soon? I mean...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Alonzo, there have been some amazing developments in self-driving cars over the past year. But none is probably more impressive than a special edition of the Mercedes S-Class which will offer drivers what feature?

BODDEN: It'll yell at other people?

SAGAL: For you.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: No, much more relaxing.

BODDEN: A massage?

SAGAL: Yes. Not only a massage, an entire spa experience in the comfort of your own car. It's got a sticker price in the six figures. And the Mercedes S-Class is generally the car you drive when you want douchebags to say, now that guy's a douchebag.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: In addition to this autonomous driving mode, it has a, quote, "energizing comfort program," which offers drivers a wide selection of the standard spa activities including calming music, aromatherapy and this random naked Russian guy sitting across from you making lots of eye contact.

(LAUGHTER)

BODDEN: Will you have to tip your car?

SAGAL: Yeah, presumably.

(LAUGHTER)

BLOUNT JR: Yeah, why do you need to go anywhere? I mean, what if you wanted to go to the spa? It would...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It would feel bad.

BLOUNT JR: Yeah.

SAGAL: If you asked the car to take you to the spa - what? I'm not enough for you anymore? I remember...

(LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: Yeah. So like - it's like asking your girlfriend to drive you to the hooker.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "RIDE WIT ME")

NELLY: (Singing) Where they at? Where they at? Where they at? Where they at? Where they at? Where they at? Where they at? C'mon. Now, if you want to go and take a ride with me, we three-wheeling in the 4 with the gold D's.

SAGAL: Coming up, our panelists are desperate for information. It's our Bluff the Listener game. Call 1-888-WAITWAIT to play. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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