The Coming Sewer Gold Rush Environmental chemists studied Swiss sewage and found trace amounts of gold, silver and rare earth metals. It could be valuable, but chemists say it's probably not worth the cost of recovering.

NPR logo

The Coming Sewer Gold Rush

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/557298069/557298073" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
The Coming Sewer Gold Rush

The Coming Sewer Gold Rush

The Coming Sewer Gold Rush

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/557298069/557298073" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Environmental chemists studied Swiss sewage and found trace amounts of gold, silver and rare earth metals. It could be valuable, but chemists say it's probably not worth the cost of recovering.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. We cannot say that in Switzerland, the streets are paved with gold. But the sewers? Environmental chemists studied Swiss sewage and found trace amounts of gold, silver and rare earth metals. Gold is used in high-tech and medical manufacturing, and some of it washes away. Scientists estimate the gold is worth $1.5 million. But if you're planning a gold rush to the sewer, chemists say it's probably not worth the cost of recovery. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2017 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.