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'Up First' Podcast: Barcelona Update; Trump's Bad Week

We get the latest from Barcelona, after a van plowed into a crowded pedestrian area, killing 13 people. ISIS has claimed responsibility. Also, we look back at President Trump's week of controversy.

Friday, August 18th, 2017

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Perceptions of discrimination track closely with voting against Trump, a survey found. Public Religion Research Institute, David Wasserman, Cook Political Report/Danielle Kurtzleben/NPR hide caption

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Public Religion Research Institute, David Wasserman, Cook Political Report/Danielle Kurtzleben/NPR

CHART: The Relationship Between Seeing Discrimination And Voting For Trump

There is an apparent correlation between a state's likelihood of having voted for Trump and whether residents think black, immigrant, and gay and lesbian communities face "a lot of discrimination."

The guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald returns to port after colliding with a merchant vessel while operating southwest of Yokosuka, Japan. MC1 Peter Burghart/U.S. Navy hide caption

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MC1 Peter Burghart/U.S. Navy

USS Fitzgerald Leaders Punished; Crew Is Praised After Collision With Cargo Ship

"Through their swift and in many cases heroic actions, members of the crew saved lives," the Navy said. It also blamed an avoidable crash on inadequate leadership and flawed teamwork.

Whitney Houston performs in 1988. The new Showtime documentary, Whitney: Can I Be Me, includes footage of her world tour in 1999. Bertrand Guay/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bertrand Guay/AFP/Getty Images

A Radiant, Isolated Star: A New Documentary Tells Whitney Houston's Story

Whitney: Can I Be Me is an unauthorized documentary that marshals the voices of Houston's friends and former employees to tell an intimate, tragic story.

A Radiant, Isolated Star: A New Documentary Tells Whitney Houston's Story

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Francine Anderson grew up in a small town in Virginia in the 1950s. She says that when she was 5 years old, she first realized that the color of her skin could put her in danger. Courtesy of StoryCorps hide caption

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Courtesy of StoryCorps

After 60 Years, Girl's Experience At Whites-Only Gas Station Still Hurts

An African-American woman remembers growing up in segregated Virginia in the 1950s, and being in the car when her father tried to get gas from a whites-only truck stop.

After 60 Years, Girl's Experience At Whites-Only Gas Station Still Hurts

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One student says she's scared to go back to Brentwood High School in Long Island after spending a month in the immigration wing of a county jail. She was suspected of being affiliated with MS-13, but she was released after a judge found there wasn't enough evidence. Frank Eltman/AP hide caption

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Frank Eltman/AP

Undocumented Teens Say They're Falsely Accused Of Being In A Gang

WNYC Radio

The clothes and colors students wear to school, the classmates they speak to and what they're suspended for is being used as evidence in immigration court that students are affiliated with MS-13.

Undocumented Teens Say They're Falsely Accused Of Being In A Gang

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White supremacists descended on Charlottesville to protest the pending removal of the statue of Robert E. Lee in the city's Emancipation Park. Julia Rendleman/AP hide caption

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Julia Rendleman/AP

'We're Not Them' — Condemning Charlottesville And Condoning White Resentment

A scholar and a journalist offer context and analysis on the events in Charlottesville and the politics of white anger.

'We're Not Them' — Condemning Charlottesville And Condoning White Resentment

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White House chief strategist Steve Bannon, seen walking into the Rose Garden in June, gave an interview with the liberal magazine The American Prospect, discussing trade and administration in-fighting. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Bannon, Unplugged: White House Strategist Pushes Trade Agenda, Undercuts Colleagues

Steve Bannon called a liberal journalist to talk China, white nationalism and his "fight" with others in the administration. "They're wetting themselves," he says of his State Department rivals.

Solar cells sit in the sun at the Desert Sunlight Solar Farm in Desert Center, Calif. The people who run California's electric grid expect the solar power output to be cut roughly in half during the eclipse. Marcus Yam/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Marcus Yam/LA Times via Getty Images

California Prepares For An Eclipse Of Its Solar Power

KQED Public Media

On a sunny day, California gets up to 40 percent of its energy from solar power, so Monday's total eclipse isn't just a scientific spectacle, it's a major concern for the state's power grid.

California Prepares For An Eclipse Of Its Solar Power

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Demonstrators march from the courthouse to the jail in Durham, N.C. Dozens of protesters attempted to turn themselves in to law enforcement Thursday in solidarity with those who have been arrested for toppling a Confederate monument earlier this week. Jonathan Drew/AP hide caption

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Jonathan Drew/AP

WATCH: Protesters Try To Surrender In Solidarity With Confederate Statue Topplers

Upward of 100 people showed up at a courthouse in Durham, N.C., to support the people arrested for tearing down a Confederate monument. Then, they tried to turn themselves in, saying, "Arrest me too!"

People in the U.S. who want to keep their activity hidden are turning to virtual private networks — but VPNs are often insecure. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Turning To VPNs For Online Privacy? You Might Be Putting Your Data At Risk

KERA

With Internet providers able to track and sell your browsing data, people who want to keep their activity hidden are turning to virtual private networks. But VPNs can themselves be insecure.

John Cho's film credits include Harold in the raunchy Harold and Kumar comedies and Sulu in Star Trek Beyond. Brendon Thorne/Getty Images for Paramount Pictures hide caption

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Brendon Thorne/Getty Images for Paramount Pictures

In 'Columbus,' John Cho Reckons With His Own First-Generation Culture Clash

Fresh Air

Cho, who moved to the U.S. from South Korea as a child, says the cultural distance his Columbus character feels towards his immigrant father was "an unwelcome reflection of my own life."

In 'Columbus,' John Cho Reckons With His Own First-Generation Culture Clash

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Kyle Quinn, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Arkansas, was wrongly identified on social media as a participant in a white supremacist march in Charlottesville, Va. Jennifer Mortensen hide caption

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Jennifer Mortensen

Kyle Quinn Hid At A Friend's House After Being Misidentified On Twitter As A Racist

A University of Arkansas professor falsely identified as a participant in a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville says the online reaction was frightening and felt like being chased by a mob.

Kyle Quinn Hid At A Friend's House After Being Misidentified On Twitter As A Racist

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Bridget Everett says her live act is about "the power of owning your own body." Monica Schipper/Getty Images hide caption

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Monica Schipper/Getty Images

'Cabaret Hurricane' Bridget Everett Moves To The Big Screen In 'Patti Cake$'

Fresh Air

The comic and cabaret performer says she's had audience members walk out of her raunchy live act. In her new film, she plays a washed-up local rock star whose daughter is an aspiring rap artist.

'Cabaret Hurricane' Bridget Everett Moves To The Big Screen In 'Patti Cake$'

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