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The Alma Mater statue on the Columbia University campus in New York City. The university has released an initial report on its historical ties to slavery in America. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Columbia University Reveals Details Of How It Profited From Slavery

Research by faculty and students found that leaders of King's College, which later became Columbia, owned slaves and that the institution raised money from those who owned enslaved people.

Rep. Michael Pompeo, R-Kan., is sworn in on Capitol Hill Jan. 12, before testifying at his confirmation hearing as CIA director before the Senate Intelligence Committee. Pompeo was confirmed by the full Senate Monday night. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Politics

Trump's Cabinet: Where It Stands On Votes, Hearings And Confirmations

The president's CIA director was confirmed by the Senate Monday night. But Trump's Cabinet is still pretty thin at this point. Here's the status of his other nominees.

James Bounds is a West Virginia miner with black lung disease; it took him four-and-a-half years to get compensation benefits. A provision in Obamacare later made qualifying for those benefits much easier. Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Shots - Health News

Obamacare Repeal Threatens A Health Benefit Popular In Coal Country

West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The Affordable Care Act made it faster and easier for a coal miner with black lung to get compensation benefits. Many in coal country want that provision retained, even if the larger law is repealed.

Obamacare Repeal Threatens A Health Benefit Popular In Coal Country

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Barron Trump (left) waves as his mother and father walk the parade route after Donald Trump was sworn in as president Friday. A Saturday Night Live writer's tweet that mocked the 10-year-old has resulted in her indefinite suspension. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Suspended 'Saturday Night Live' Writer Apologizes For Tweet About Barron Trump

Writer Katie Rich has apologized after an attempt at humor that resulted in her indefinite suspension, a person familiar with the situation says.

"Only Parliament can grant rights to the British people — and only Parliament can take them away," says lead claimant Gina Miller, seen here speaking outside the Supreme Court in London Tuesday. Judges sided with Miller in her case seeking to block Prime Minister Theresa May's plan to trigger Brexit. Leon Neal/Getty Images hide caption

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Leon Neal/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

U.K. Parliament Must Trigger Brexit, Highest Court Says, Dealing Setback To May

The prime minister's office says the ruling "does nothing to change" its timetable of leaving the economic union by the end of March.

The Food and Drug Administration headquarters in Silver Spring, Md. The FDA is one of a number of federal agencies with wide-ranging regulatory power intended to protect Americans. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

News

President Trump To Cut Regulations By '75 Percent' — How Real Is That?

The president greeted business leaders on his first full weekday in office by promising to eliminate three-fourths of federal regulations. Easier said than done. Much easier.

President Trump To Cut Regulations By '75 Percent' — How Real Is That?

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A mobile clinic outside Mombassa, Kenya, provides women in rural areas with family planning options like contraceptive implants and offers cervical cancer screening as well. Jonathan Torgovnik/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Torgovnik/Getty Images

Goats and Soda

Trump Bans U.S. Funding For Groups That 'Promote' Abortion Overseas

The new president has reinstated the "Mexico City" policy first instituted by Ronald Reagan in 1984. And this version is even broader than previous ones.

Rain and radio towers in Austin, Texas. Scientists found that turning off steady beam lights on towers reduced bird fatalities by 70 percent. Cherry Bream/Flickr hide caption

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Cherry Bream/Flickr

Around the Nation

How To Make Broadcast Towers More Bird-Friendly: Turn Off Some Lights

CMU Public Radio

Millions of migratory birds die every year after slamming into broadcast and cell towers. Scientists found that turning off steady-beam lights on towers reduced bird fatalities by 70 percent.

How To Make Broadcast Towers More Bird-Friendly: Turn Off Some Lights

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Farmers and chefs looking for their perfect match at Bluejacket, a restaurant and brewery in Washington, D.C. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

The Salt

'Speed Dating' For Farmers And Chefs: ISO A Perfect Local-Food Match

Farmers are shy; chefs are ferocious. But they need each other to put local food on restaurant tables. A "speed-dating" event in Washington, D.C. matches farmers with chefs, aided by free beer.

'Speed Dating' For Farmers And Chefs: ISO A Perfect Local-Food Match

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Melissa Morris outside her home in Sterling, Colo. She quit using heroin in 2012, and now relies on the drug Suboxone to stay clean. She's also been helping to find treatment for some of the neighbors she used to sell drugs to. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Shots - Health News

Rural Colorado's Opioid Connections Might Hold Clues To Better Treatment

KUNC

Opioid abuse is rising fast among those who live in rural areas. Research suggests the drugs' illicit use there spreads rapidly via social networks, which could be part of the solution, too.

Rural Colorado's Opioid Connections Might Hold Clues To Better Treatment

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Artist's rendering of two individuals of Siamogale melilutra, one of them feeding on a freshwater clam. Mauricio Antón/Journla of Systematic Palaeontology hide caption

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Mauricio Antón/Journla of Systematic Palaeontology

The Two-Way - News Blog

Scientists Discover Prehistoric Giant Otter Species In China

Six million years ago, giant otters weighing more than 100 pounds lived among birds and water lilies in the wooded wetlands of China's Yunnan province. The discovery sheds light on how otters evolved.

Police stand guard outside the Trump International Hotel in Washington the day before the inauguration. The president's business interest in a government-owned property has drawn criticism from Democrats and some ethics advisers. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

Trump Files Documents To Shift Management Of Businesses To His Sons

For many weeks, the president said he would step away from managing his businesses, but offered no evidence. Now documents are turning up, showing he no longer is listed as top executive.

On the left, President Trump takes the oath of office at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 20. On the right, protesters attend the Women's March on Washington the next day. Crowd estimates for both events were in the 100,000s but varied considerably. Scott Olson/Getty Images; Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images; Mario Tama/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Politics Aside, Counting Crowds Is Tricky

Claims about the size of crowds for both President Trump's inauguration and the protests that followed the day after are being debated. Scientists struggle with how to do that kind of head count.

Politics Aside, Counting Crowds Is Tricky

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Wetlands and marshlands that once protected New Orleans and the surrounding areas from storm surge have been depleted over the years. Here, the $1.1 billion Lake Borgne Surge Barrier outside New Orleans in 2015. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Environment

To Fight Coastal Damage, Louisiana Parishes Pushed To Sue Energy Industry

WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Louisiana has a $90 billion plan to fight coastal erosion. Gov. John Bel Edwards says suing oil and gas firms, which have contributed to the damage, will help foot the bill. But he faces obstacles.

To Fight Coastal Damage, Louisiana Parishes Pushed To Sue Energy Industry

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A composite image of Earth taken at 1:07 p.m. ET on January 15 by the GOES-16 satellite. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hide caption

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National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

The Two-Way - News Blog

'Like High-Definition From The Heavens': NOAA Releases New Images Of Earth

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released the first public images from its new weather satellite. The agency says the satellite's data will lead to more accurate weather forecasts.