Diagnosis by text or a phone call is often convenient and popular with patients. But is it good medicine? Apriori/iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption Apriori/iStockphoto

Shots - Health News

Texas Puts Brakes On Telemedicine — And Teladoc Cries Foul KERA

As consulting a doctor exclusively by phone, text or video becomes more popular, the Texas Medical Board moves to restrict these e-visits. Is the real battle over patient safety, money or turf?

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KERA

Soviet-era Metro cars are exhibited at the Partizanskaya subway station in Moscow on May 15 as part of festivities marking the subway's 80th anniversary. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Pavel Golovkin/AP

Parallels - World News

Glory Of Moscow's 80-Year-Old Subway Tainted By Stalin Connections

The system was considered a triumph by the Soviets. But it was built by the same ruthless means that helped cause a famine, which killed millions in the 1930s.

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Demonstrators in the Turkish capital of Ankara hold posters of Ozgecan Aslan, a 20-year-old student who was allegedly killed by a bus driver after fighting off a sexual assault. Burhan Ozbilici/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Burhan Ozbilici/AP

Parallels - World News

Violence Against Women Is Often A Private Family Matter In Turkey

Women's rights advocates say more than 100 women have been killed in the country so far this year, most by male relatives.

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Chef Eric David Corradetti presents dinner to residents at the Bethlehem Woods senior living facility in La Grange Park, Ill. His kitchen emphasizes fresh produce and meats and meals made from scratch. Courtesy of Unidine hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Unidine

The Salt

Mush No More: Retirement Home Food Gets Fresh And Local

Once known for bland, institutional fare, hundreds of senior living centers across the U.S. now tout healthy meals made from scratch. Centers say this approach to food is tastier — and cheaper, too.

"Over the moon excited, terrified, scared, emotional," is how Jetta'Mae Carlisle says she felt before her surgery. Deborah Svoboda for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Deborah Svoboda for NPR

Shots - Health News

What It's Like To Choose Transgender Sex Reassignment Surgery

There are many different ways to be transgender. For some people that includes sex reassignment surgery. A young filmmaker follows two people who made that choice through their year of transition.

Jim Cheatham, a biologist with the National Park Service, studies the ways nitrogen in the air has been disrupting the ecological balance of Rocky Mountain National Park. Luke Runyon/KUNC hide caption

itoggle caption Luke Runyon/KUNC

The Salt

It's Raining Nitrogen In A Colorado Park. Farmers Can Help Make It Stop KUNC

Scientists say too much airborne nitrogen from farms is throwing off the ecological balance of Rocky Mountain National Park. The federal government is hoping weather alerts for farmers will help.

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KUNC

Attorney John Elwood talks to reporters Dec. 1 outside the Supreme Court building in Washington after arguing on behalf of Anthony Elonis, who was convicted in 2010 on the grounds of threatening his wife via social media. On Monday the court ruled in favor of Elonis, saying prosecutors must prove that a social media threat was intentional, not just perceived. Jonathan Ernst/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Jonathan Ernst/Reuters/Landov

It's All Politics

Threatened Online? Prosecutors Must Prove Intent

The Supreme Court declined to say exactly what sort of evidence could prove that an online post — such as "took all the strength I had not to ... slit her throat" — was intended to spark fear.

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul speaks to reporters Sunday after leaving the Senate floor, where he spoke about surveillance legislation. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Drew Angerer/Getty Images

It's All Politics

Americans Say They Want The Patriot Act Renewed ... But Do They, Really?

A new poll says Americans are OK with continued collection of phone data. Yet another recent survey says a majority wants limits on the kind of data the government can collect. What's going on?

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