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'Murder,' South Korean Leader Says Of Ferry Captain's Actions

A prayer for the missing and dead: Family members and friends have gathered in the port city of Jindo, South Korea, as the search continues for the scores of passengers still missing after last Wednesday's ferry disaster. At the water's edge, many are offering prayers — including this woman. hide caption

itoggle caption Issei Kato /Reuters/Landov

The Two-Way - News Blog

'Murder,' South Korean Leader Says Of Ferry Captain's Actions

President Park Geun-hye says the captain did little to help the hundreds on board escape. More than 60 bodies have been recovered. More than 230 people, most of them high school students, are missing.

Scribes Are Back, Helping Doctors Tackle Electronic Medical Records

As the doctor examines a patient, medical scribe Connie Gayton records the visit using a microhone tethered to her laptop. hide caption

itoggle caption Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR

Shots - Health News

Scribes Are Back, Helping Doctors Tackle Electronic Medical Records

In ancient times scribes were used to record everything from prayers to legal transactions. Now they're making a comeback in the doctor's office, easing the transition to electronic medical records.

Who Should Pay To Keep The Internet's Locks Secure?

A lock icon signifies an encrypted Internet connection. But thanks to a recently discovered (and now fixed) bug, it's been bleeding out information for a few years. hide caption

itoggle caption Mal Langsdon/Reuters/Landov

All Tech Considered

Who Should Pay To Keep The Internet's Locks Secure? KQED

Fortune 1000 companies rely on the open source software OpenSSL for their core business. Two-thirds of websites use it. But no one pays for it and it's never had a complete security audit.

From member station

KQED
'Hurricane' Carter Dies; Boxer Was Wrongfully Convicted Of Murder

Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, the former boxer who spent years wrongfully incarcerated for murder, has died at age 76. his life inspired a Bob Dylan protest song and the film Hurricane, starring Denzel Washington. hide caption

itoggle caption Paul Kane/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

'Hurricane' Carter Dies; Boxer Was Wrongfully Convicted Of Murder

Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, the former boxing champion who served nearly 20 years in prison, has died of prostate cancer. Carter's story inspired a Bob Dylan protest song; he was 76.

California's Drought Ripples Through Businesses, Then To Schools

Cannon Michael's farm grows tomatoes, melons and onions, among other crops. This year, however, Michael will have to fallow one-fifth of the land due to the drought Thomas Dreisbach/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Thomas Dreisbach/NPR

Around the Nation

California's Drought Ripples Through Businesses, Then To Schools

California farmers produce an enormous proportion of American produce, but the state is now experiencing a record-breaking drought that is being felt throughout the state and the U.S.

LA County's New Watchdog May Not Have Much Bite

Prosecutor Max Huntsman delivers his closing arguments in the corruption trial of Angela Spaccia, the former city manager of Bell, Calif., in November. Huntsman's new challenge is to monitor the scandal-ridden LA County Sheriff's Department. hide caption

itoggle caption Pool/Getty Images

Around the Nation

LA County's New Watchdog May Not Have Much Bite

Max Huntsman's job is to monitor the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, one of the nation's most troubled law enforcement agencies. The only problem: He doesn't have any real legal power.

A Scientific Experiment: Field Trips Just For Teachers

Science teachers huddle over bacteria colonies at Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry. The museum plans to train 1,000 area educators to be better science teachers in the next five years. hide caption

itoggle caption Linda Lutton/WBEZ

Around the Nation

A Scientific Experiment: Field Trips Just For Teachers

Educators say the middle grades are a key time time to get kids jazzed about science, but many teachers say they lack the tools they need. In Chicago, a science museum is helping to fill the the gap.

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