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New NPR Series 'Borderland: Dispatches From The U.S.-Mexico Boundary'

NPR NEWS SERIES 'BORDERLAND' EXPLORES STORIES OF THE U.S.-MEXICO BORDER

Traveling Entire Border, NPR News Team Reports on How Two Nations Influence One Another

Reports on NPR Newsmagazines March 19-28; Online at npr.org/borderland

Visit the 'Borderland' Series Page

March 19, 2014; Washington, D.C. – In an effort to discover how two nations influence each other, Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep and a team of NPR journalists traveled the 1,900-mile length of the U.S.-Mexico border to report on the people, goods and culture that cross the heavily-fortified boundary. NPR News presents the dispatches and related coverage as the multipart series "Borderland," exploring major issues such as immigration, the drug trade, business and cultural change through the personal stories of people who live where the countries meet. "Borderland" begins airing today on Morning Edition, continuing daily until March 28 across the show as well as All Things Considered and Weekend Edition Saturday and Sunday, and are also available online at npr.org/borderland.

"Borderland" humanizes border issues, which are hotly-debated but not always well-illuminated. Inskeep and fellow journalists talk with migrants, refugees and law enforcement officials, and meet with writers, musicians and workers in Mexican factories known as maquiladoras. NPR's John Burnett, Kelly McEvers, Carrie Kahn and Ted Robbins, as well as Monica Ortiz-Uribe and Jude Joffe-Block of public radio's Fronteras Desk also offer complementary reports in the series.

Inskeep and crew travel extensively through the expansive region, crossing the border 22 times. The "Borderland" drive begins at the mouth of the Rio Grande, on the Gulf of Mexico, and continues westward through deserts and mountains to the Pacific coast at Tijuana. The road trip leads from a cultural festival in Brownsville, TX, to the neighborhoods of Juarez, Mexico, to the desert wilds of the Tohono O'odhan Indian nation in Arizona, along the way passing through an immense region the group calls Borderland: for all its varieties of people and geography, every part of the area is shaped by the shared experience of the border itself.

All of the on-air and web-exclusive reports will be available online at npr.org/borderland along with photo essays from the trip. More pictures and short stories logged during the drive can also be found at the NPR On The Road Tumblr and posts tagged #nprborderland through social media.

Morning Edition, the two-hour newsmagazine airing weekdays and hosted by Steve Inskeep and David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne from NPR West in Culver City, Calif., is public radio's most listened-to program with more than 13 million weekly listeners. For local stations and broadcast times, visit www.NPR.org/stations.

Contact

NPR Media Relations: Emerson Brown
Email: mediarelations (at) npr.org