Excerpts from NPR News Interview with NC's Governor-Elect Roy Cooper NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with North Carolina's governor-elect Roy Cooper about the legislature's failure to repeal the state's controversial HB2 law.
NPR logo Excerpts from NPR News Interview with NC's Governor-Elect Roy Cooper

Excerpts from NPR News Interview with NC's Governor-Elect Roy Cooper

Democratic challenger Roy Cooper has a lead of more than 6,000 votes over Gov. Pat McCrory. He's seen here with his wife, Kristin, at an election night rally in Raleigh. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

Democratic challenger Roy Cooper has a lead of more than 6,000 votes over Gov. Pat McCrory. He's seen here with his wife, Kristin, at an election night rally in Raleigh.

Gerry Broome/AP

Thursday, December 22, 2016; Washington, D.C. - In an interview airing today on All Things Considered, NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with North Carolina's governor-elect Roy Cooper about how the Republican-controlled legislature failed to repeal HB2, a controversial state law that limits civil rights protections for LGBT people.

Stations and broadcast times are available at NPR.org/stations

Excerpts from the extended conversation are available below.

When asked about future possibilities of repealing HB2, Cooper said: "It was our best chance to get this done, but it cannot be our only chance. When I get sworn in next year, we're going to work to get this repealed because, number one, it discriminates against people and it's wrong in and of itself . But we know that this is costing us and we've got to fix it."

Cooper also said: "House Bill 2 does not reflect who we are as North Carolinians. We want people of all kinds to be here. We're open for business. And I'm going to keep working very hard to get this repealed."

When asked whether he can work with Republicans, Cooper said: "I'm going to fight them toe-to-toe on issues we disagree with. But if there are areas where we can work together and we can find agreement, I will. And I think that's the kind of leadership that people want our elected officials to show."

PLEASE NOTE: A transcript of the interview is available upon request, but is embargoed until airtime today, December 22 at 4:06 PM (ET).


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Email: mediarelations (at) npr.org