Media Advisory: Excerpts from NPR News Interview with Senator Chuck Schumer NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Senator Schumer about Russian hacking, President-elect Trump's use of Twitter, and the future of the Affordable Care Act.
NPR logo Media Advisory: Excerpts from NPR News Interview with Senator Chuck Schumer

Media Advisory: Excerpts from NPR News Interview with Senator Chuck Schumer

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) talks to reporters Wednesday at the U.S. Capitol. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) talks to reporters Wednesday at the U.S. Capitol.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Friday, January 6, 2016; Washington D.C. – In an interview airing today on All Things Considered, NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer about Russian hacking, President-elect Trump's use of Twitter, and the future of the Affordable Care Act.

Stations and broadcast times are available at NPR.org/stations

Excerpts from the extended conversation are available below.

When asked about President-elect Trump's reaction to reports of Russian hacking and involvement in U.S. election activity; Schumer said: "Before you even get the briefing, you come to a conclusion — that's not the way to govern. And I have said [...] that we can't have a Twitter presidency. This is serious stuff, this governing, and to just be flip and glib and tweet [...] you've got to do a lot more. And certainly any president – Democrat, Republican, liberal, conservative — should keep an open mind until they get the briefing."

When asked about President-elect Trump referring to Senator Schumer as a "clown" over Twitter; Schumer said: "I didn't tweet back a name — that's derogating the debate." [...]"I said I understand your anguish, Mr. President-elect, because you don't know what to replace the ACA with. But instead of calling names, roll up your sleeves and come up with a replacement. So I'm not going to descend to name-calling."

When asked about Republican plans to repeal the Affordable Care Act, Schumer hinted at the Democrats' relatively weak position. He repeatedly said Democrats would not cooperate with any Affordable Care Act replacement if the GOP pushes ahead with repeal, but then allowed that "there might be a thing or two" in competing Republican plans that are appealing. Schumer also brought negotiations into the open by putting public pressure on Republican Senators Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski to vote against repeal.

"Now they want to eliminate the funding of Planned Parenthood," he said, referring to a plan by House Speaker Paul Ryan to include such provisions in legislation undoing Obamacare, "so people like Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski are having some qualms about this."

PLEASE NOTE: A transcript of the interview is available upon request, but is embargoed until airtime today, January 6 at 5:20 PM (ET).

Contact:

Ben Fishel, NPR Media Relations
Email: mediarelations (at) npr.org