NPR/IPSOS Poll: What Do Americans Know About Obamacare? A new NPR/Ipsos poll seeks to reveal the public's knowledge and perception of some basic aspects of healthcare.
NPR logo NPR/IPSOS Poll: What Do Americans Know About Obamacare?

NPR/IPSOS Poll: What Do Americans Know About Obamacare?

Source: Ipsos survey of 1,011 U.S. adults conducted Jan. 4-5, 2017. The margin of error is +/- 3.5 percentage points for all respondents, +/- 5.7 percentage points for Democrats, +/- 6.1 percentage points for Republicans and +/- 7.7 percentage points for Independents. Credit: Alyson Hurt and Katie Park/NPR hide caption

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Credit: Alyson Hurt and Katie Park/NPR

Source: Ipsos survey of 1,011 U.S. adults conducted Jan. 4-5, 2017. The margin of error is +/- 3.5 percentage points for all respondents, +/- 5.7 percentage points for Democrats, +/- 6.1 percentage points for Republicans and +/- 7.7 percentage points for Independents.

Credit: Alyson Hurt and Katie Park/NPR

Washington D.C. – Obamacare was one of the most contentious topics of the 2016 elections – but what do Americans really know about the U.S. healthcare system?

Did the Affordable Care Act reduce the number of uninsured? Do Americans pay more for healthcare than people in other countries?

A new NPR/Ipsos poll seeks to reveal the public's knowledge and perception of some basic aspects of healthcare. This is the first in a series of NPR/Ipsos polls called, "What Do You Know?"

Key Findings:

Over half of respondents did not know that the number of insured Americans had increased since passage of the Affordable Care Act.

  • 24% incorrectly believed the number of uninsured had increased
  • 10% incorrectly believed the uninsured rate stayed the same
  • 17% said they didn't know what the law's effect has been on insurance coverage.

Democrats were better informed than Republicans of the effects of the ACA on the uninsured.

  • 54% of Democrats surveyed say the law had reduced the number of people without insurance, compared to 41 percent of Republicans.

Misconceptions about so-called "death panels" endure

  • 32% incorrectly believe the ACA has limits on end-of-life care
  • 18% correctly believe the ACA does not have limits on end-of-life care
  • 50% don't know if the ACA has limits on end-of-life care

Most people DON'T want lawmakers to repeal the law until they have a replacement plan in place.

  • 38% believe Obamacare should be strengthened or expanded
  • 31% believe Obamacare should be repealed and replaced
  • 14% believe Obamacare should be repealed and NOT replaced

The majority of those surveyed DID know that the ACA protects pre-existing conditions.

The majority were aware that Americans generally pay more for health care than people in other countries.

A majority knew that the U.S. health care system does not produce the "best results in the world.".

Read more about the NPR/Ipsos poll HERE



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About Ipsos
Ipsos Group S.A. is a global market research and a consulting firm with worldwide headquarters in Paris, France. The company was founded in 1975 by Didier Truchot, Chairman and CEO, and has been publicly traded on the Paris Stock Exchange since 1 July 1999.

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